Alighieri, jewelry

“Inspired by his odyssey, I imagined these characters in gold, wrapped around my neck, and weaving their way through my fingers, as I read.

Alighieri is a collection of jewellery inspired by Dante Alighieri’s Divine Comedy; each piece corresponds to one of the poet’s 100 poems. As the pilgrim journeys through the realms of Hell, Purgatory, and Paradise, he encounters mythical creatures, scraggy landscapes, and terrifying demons.

“London-based, Rosh Mahtani studied French and Italian at Oxford University. Upon graduating in 2012, she was inspired to create modern heirlooms, born from the literature she had studied: Dante Alighieri’s Divine Comedy, in particular.” […]    –from the Alighieri “About” page

Wertyo, Tartarus (2019)

“Hailing from Alberta, Canada, Wertyo began as a Vaporwave artist, releasing two EPs in the genre. Together, they were streamed over 1 million times from people all over the world.  Enter Tartarus, Wertyo’s first feature length album. No longer vaporwave, this concept album changes from romantic era classical to avant-garde jazz over the course of its 25 tracks.  Inspired by Dante Alighieri’s Divine Comedy, the album follows the poem through its three canticheInferno, Purgatorio, and Paradiso.”    —Wertyo

 

Professor Fabian Alfie’s Tattoo

Professor Fabian Alfie’s tattoo.  Inferno 34.139.

The Rouge Theater, “Dante’s Purgatorio (2014)

“Dante’s Purgatorio
Written by Patrick Baliani
Directed by Joseph McGrath

See also the performance by The Fountain School at Dalhousie University, 2018

Luar’s Spring 2019 collection for the ‘Thotaissance’

“For his spring 2019 collection, Luar designer Raul Lopez was inspired by Dante Alighieri’s Divine Comedy. Or, more specifically, Purgatorio. While Lopez’s white, billowing pieces felt far more suited to the angels than Dante’s frozen, three-faced Satan, he was hoping to lift the audience up and away from 2018’s endless waves of bad news. ‘It’s like we’re living in purgatory right now,’ he said. ‘And I wanted to take us out of it.’

“If the goal was to distract people from the hellscape that is our current world, Lopez definitely succeeded. The show guests watched open-mouthed as models strolled by in ornate confections that seemed to float (as Dante put it, the designer ‘[deals] with shadows as with solid things’). They wore sculptural knife pleats and headpieces that looked like whipped cotton candy, and smeared, lived-in makeup.”    –Jocelyn Silver, Paper Magazine, September 17, 2018

Riccardo Milani, Come un gatto in tangenziale (2018)

A still from the film

Contributed by Silvia Salvatici and Gianni Guastella

Dante’s Inferno performance in the Gole dell’Ancantara in Taormina (2018)

Information on the performance, here

Sky Bardsey, The Afterwards series

“The Afterwards is a nine volume novel series, by Sky Bardsey that I personally think is a reimagined version of Dante’s Inferno. That is, if Dante were a teenage girl and lived right now. The edgy books are narrated in the first-person POV and are filled with hidden meanings and homages to Dante’s vision of Hell. However, this series seriously challenges and changes some of his assertions.”    –Heather M.

http://solsticiorebelde.com/featured-book/

(Contributed by Heather M. at Solsticio, Rebelde and Company)

Fantasia (1940)

“The last segment of the 1940 movie Fantasia features the devil Chernabog who awakes on Bald Mountain and is seen torturing restless souls and throwing them into a fiery volcano.  What I particularly love about that piece is that Chernabog is banished by the chorus of monks chanting Ave Maria as the journey into the nearby cathedral.”    -Samuel Gray

(Contributed by Samuel Gray, University of Mary Washington, ’18)

Silent Hill 2

“[There] is a video-game that came out in 2001 called Silent Hill 2.  The game is part of a series, but the second game is usually best remembered.  The town called Silent Hill is not officially called “Hell” but it functions the same way.  The protagonist, James Sunderland, doesn’t have a guide like Dante does, but he does meet a variety of people along the way, each one afflicted by their own guilt.  The town has a way of bringing guilt into physical manifestation, taking the form of various hideous-looking monsters.  The allusion to hell occurs when James goes BELOW the town, taking elevators and stairwells deeper, deeper, and deeper than should even be conceivably possible.”   –Samuel Gray

Contributed by Samuel Gray, University of Mary Washington, ’18