Gary Panter, Jimbo’s Inferno (2006)

gary-panter-jimbos-inferno-2006“Panter is a legend of independent comics; considered the father of punk comics, he has influenced many, including Matt Groening, and warped the look of children’s television with his sets for Pee Wee’s Playhouse. Jimbo’s Inferno is the prequel to his critically acclaimed Jimbo in Purgatory, which came out in 2004. Inferno originally appeared as part of a short-lived line of art comics published by Groening, but here it’s been reformatted to the terrifyingly deluxe oversized standards of Purgatory. Like that volume, this follows the outlines of Dante’s Divine Comedy, but combines and conflates specific events, looking at them all with a satiric rock and roll flair. The erstwhile hero, Jimbo, guided by the boxlike Valise, travels into Focky Bocky, a subterranean mall that spirals downwards, containing a modern vision of hell. The art is a Boschian mishmash of grotesque and comic, all in Panter’s signature proto-punk style. The dialogue borrows as much from Dante as from Lewis Carroll and Frank Zappa. Together, it is a dizzying re-envisioning of Dante. Perhaps because of its earlier format, it lacks the intricate polish that made Jimbo in Purgatory a groundbreaking comic, but as a rough sketch of twisted genius, it still amazes. (Apr.)”    –Publishers Weekly, Amazon

LeRoi Jones/Amiri Baraka, “The System of Dante’s Hell” (1965)

“[T]he function of writing about Dante and the control over access to the part of the tradition that Dante inhabits can liberate the black writer. At least it liberates LeRoi Jones, turning him into a new man with a new name, Amiri Baraka, whose experimental literary project culminates in The System of Dante’s Hell in 1965. Dante’s poem (specifically in the Sinclair translation) provides a grid for the narrative of Baraka’s autobiographical novel, and at the same time the Italian poet’s description of hell functions for Baraka like a gloss on many of his own experiences. [. . .] Baraka uses Dante first to measure the growing distance between himself and European literature, then, paradoxically, to separate himself totally from it. His Dante is a marker of separation rather than integration.” — Dennis Looney, Freedom Readers: The African-American Reception of Dante Alighieri and the Divine Comedy (Univ. of Notre Dame Press, 2011), pp. 105-106

“L’inferno di Topolino” (1949)


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Reprinted by Corriere della Sera (2006) (retrieved on September 15, 2006).

See also Alberto Brambilla’s 2013 blogpost on the origins of L’Inferno di Topolino.

Tribute to Dante’s “Comedy” Art Exhibit

tribute-to-dantes-comedy-art-exhibitPatrons of Art, San Francisco, May 2007 (retrieved September 15, 2006)

Dante Tarot Cards

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Found at Alida Store and Oracle of Tarot

“Dante, Hero of Sinners”

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“You already have your summer getaway planned, but what about your permanent vacation? Given your options, Hell may be less temperate, but its hidden perks make it well worth the trip.” [. . .]    –Michael Rottman, The Morning News, June 27, 2006

The Divine Comedy, “A Short Album About Love” (1997)

the-divine-comedy-a-short-album-about-love-1997“The Divine Comedy is Neil Hannon. Over the years, the name has encompassed other musicians, but the driving force of the band and its main (sometimes only!) member has always been Neil Hannon. He chose the name ‘The Divine Comedy’ aged 18, almost at random. He and two Enniskillen school friends needed a new name for their band and Neil spotted a copy of Dante’s epic poem on the family bookshelf. It stuck, and a year later it was the name under which the trio signed to Irish run indie Setanta Records. They left Northern Ireland, moved into a squat in London, released a mini-album, 1990’s REM/Ride influenced ‘Fanfare for the Comic Muse’ and ’91’s ‘Europop’ E.P. then split up. Neil’s bandmates went to university and Neil returned home.”    —The Divine Comedy

“Wickedly Whimsical Jewelry”

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Vogue, September 2006 (retrieved on September 15, 2006)

Sin-O-Mints: “For the Sinner in You”

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Found at: Santosha (retrieved on September 15, 2006)
See also: Philosopher’s Guild (retrieved on June 7, 2013)

“Dante, Virgil To Tour L.A.”

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Found at The Onion, June 10, 1998