How to Parent Like a Bolshevik

[…] “The Bolsheviks, secure in their economic determinism, assumed that the outside world would join them as a matter of course, and embraced non-Communist art and literature as both prologue and accompaniment to their own. Even at the height of fear and suspicion, when anyone connected to the outside world might be subject to sacrificial murder, Soviet readers were expected to learn from Dante, Shakespeare and Cervantes.” […]    —October 30, 2017

Giuseppe de Liguoro, L’Inferno, 1911

inferno-film-1911

“The Italian epic came of age with Giuseppe de Liguoro’s imaginative silent version of the Inferno, loosely adapted from Dante and inspired by the illustrations of Gustave Doré. L’Inferno was first screened in Naples in the Teatro Mercadante 10 March 1911. The film took over three years to make involving more than 150 people and was the first full length Italian feature film ever made. Its success was not confined to Italy it was an international hit taking more than $2 million in the United States alone.

“Tangerine Dream have composed the soundtrack based on their opera of Dante’s Inferno producing a soundtrack truly worthy of their position as one of the top film music composers in the world.”  —L’Inferno film promotional site

Evelyn Paul, Stories from Dante (1911) Greeting Cards

evelyn-paul-stories-from-dante-1911-greeting-cards

Spirit of the Ages’ Greeting Card Illustrations by Evelyn Paul for “Stories from Dante” (1911).

Contributed by Virginia Jewiss (Yale Humanities Program)

Francesco Bertolini, Giuseppe De Liguoro, and Adolfo Padovan, “L’Inferno” (1911)

francesco-bertolini-giuseppe-de-liguoro-and-adolf-padovan-linferno-1911Watch YouTube video clips of Inferno (1911) and Satan Eating Human (1911).

“The Italian epic came of age with Giuseppe de Liguoro’s imaginative silent version of the Inferno, loosely adapted from Dante and inspired by the illustrations of Gustav Doré. L’Inferno was first screened in Naples in the Teatro Mercadante 10 March 1911. The film took over three years to make involving more than 150 people and was the first full length Italian feature film ever made. It’s success was not confined to Italy it was an international hit taking more than $2 million in the United States alone.
Tangerine Dream have composed the soundtrack based on their opera of Dante’s Inferno producing a soundtrack truly worthy of their position as one of the top film music composers in the world.”    —L’inferno.com

Contributed by J. Patrick Brown (Bowdoin, ’09)