Underworld – Saint Seiya

“The Underworld (冥界, Meikai) or Inferno (地獄, Jigoku) is the realm of the dead where souls are placed after death. What area the souls reside in are determined by the Three Judges. It is the habitat of all Specters, including the god Hades (in classic myth, it is also the second residence of Hades’s wife, Persephone).

The Meikai Underworld was created by Hades to forever punish humans for their crimes. No life is possible in the Underworld without the Eighth Sense (or special devices), as all things in the Underworld normally fall under the control of Hades. Specters are unaffected, and may enter and leave at the discretion of Hades because they wear Surplices.

As depicted by Masami Kurumada, the Underworld is composed of eight prisons, with further subdivisions (the 7th prison is divided in three valleys, the 8th in ten pits, the 9th in four regions). All of the Prisons correspond to the nine Circles of Hell depicted in Dante Alighieri’s Divine Comedy, which itself borrows heavily from Greek myths. In addition, it also contains the passage to the Elysian Fields, where only those chosen by the gods can go.”    —Seiyapedia, September 12, 2018

Learn more about the Saint Seiya series here.

Denton Designs’ Dante’s Inferno (1986)

“With only one life, this is quite an unforgiving game. Nevertheless, it’s overall pretty nice to play, albeit short. The best feature is the creepy atmosphere, which captures fairly well the one of the book, of a place actually more desolate and sorrowful than plain scary.”    — User Demon, Lemon64, June 1, 2015

Denton Designs’ 1986 video game, Dante’s Inferno, for the Commodore 64.

Watch Retro Arcade Classics complete the game here.

Federico Fellini, “Ginger e Fred” (1986)

federico-fellini-ginger-e-fred

“In the opening scenes, a group of TV variety show guests and performers are riding in a van from Termini Station to the TV studio for the taping of the show. Playing on the video monitor in the the van is what appears to be a children’s show, featuring a Dante marionette who is lost in a dark forest. The sequence ends as Dante finds a compass and happily walks home.”    –Roy Scarbrough

Contributed by Roy Scarbrough