Devilman Lady Vol. 16 Chapter 7 – Demon Lord Dante

“Ryo Utsugi makes another appearance in one of Go Nagai’s works,’Devilman Lady‘. This time, he is the reincarnation of Dante Alighieri, Mao Dante. He can be found in Hell where Devilman Lady must combat him.” — Contributor Savannah Mikus

Check out the full chapter here. Devilman Lady Vol.16 was originally published by Kodansha on July 21st, 2000.

Click here for another post about Go Nagai’s 1971 manga Mao Dante.

Contributed by Savannah Mikus (FSU 2020)

Amanda Craig, In a Dark Wood (2000)

“The dark wood in the title of British writer Amanda Craig’s third novel (her first to be published in the U.S.) is the same one a certain Florentine poet got lost in 700 years ago. Benedick Hunter is halfway through the journey of our life and, like Dante, discovers that he’s wandered into a murky and threatening place, metaphorically speaking.

“A London actor whose career is idling and whose novelist wife, with her ‘air of terrifying competence,’ has left him for her prosperous publisher, Benedick slinks off to bunk in the attic of a family friend’s house, where he can hide from his overbearing father. (‘He is a columnist, so judging others comes naturally to him,’ explains Benedick with false nonchalance.) […]” —Laura Miller, Review of In a Dark Wood by Amanda Craig, Salon.com, Feb. 21, 2002

See the author’s page here.

Wallace Zane, Taxi Inferno (2014)

Taxi InfernoA death and violence, deceit and fraud, cab-driving, police-chasing translation of Dante’s Inferno.

“Set in the hellish world of cab-driving in Los Angeles in the year 2000, Taxi Inferno is an idiomatic interpretation/translation and transposition of Inferno. In place of Dante walking through hell with Virgil as the guide, the author is driving a cab in LA with Charles Bukowski. The narrative is shot through with the feel of dim and smoky death and the thrall of disgust that impels one on, as is Dante’s.

Taxi Inferno is written as a mirror image of Inferno. Virgil becomes less competent the deeper into hell they go; Bukowski becomes more so, and even heroic in his guidance. Each location in Los Angeles compares with one of the circles of hell, corresponding to Dante’s description of the terrain and its punishments.”    —Amazon.com

Contributed by Wallace Zane

D.A. Camp’s Digital Art Inspired by the Commedia

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See more information and images at Dante’s World.

“My Dante,” Frank Ambrosio and Edward Maloney, Georgetown University

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“Conceived as a digital incarnation of the medieval illuminated manuscript, My Dante fosters an entirely new type of contemplative reading experience. MyDante encourages readers to experience the poem in a way that is profoundly personal, while at the same time enabling a collaborative experience of a journey shared by a community of readers.
MyDante was originally developed for a philosophy course at Georgetown University, and a public version is currently in development that will be free and open to anyone.”    —My Dante Blog

Visit Georgetown’s My Dante site.

South Park

south-parkIn “South Park” (episode 410), there is a reference to the River Styx condominiums in hell.

Contributed by Tyler Doherty (EHS student)

Sante Maurizi, “Paolo e Francesca” (2000-2001)

sante-maurizi-paolo-e-francesca-2000-2001-la-botte-e-il-cilindro-theater-sassari-sardinia

“Paolo e Francesca” is a journey through the different ways in which the story told by Dante in Inferno V has be represented in visual art, theater, poetry, etc.

See La Botta e il Cilindro for information on the play and a wonderful collection of illustrations of the Paolo and Francesca scene from Inf. V.

Frasier Season 8

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In the fourth episode of the eighth season of Frasier (November 14, 2000), Frasier offers to tutor his boss on the finer things in life saying that he will be the Virgil to his boss’ Dante.

Contributed by Charlie Russell-Schlesinger (Bowdoin, ’08)

Kozik’s Inferno (2000)

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“Kozik’s Inferno” is a twelve-episode animated version by Frank Kozik, a rock n’ roll poster artist in San Francisco. It was featured as an internet cartoon in 2000. (Produced by W!ldbrain, Inc.)

Watch video episode here.

Contributed by George Evelyn

Rolando Perez, “The Electric Comedy” (2000)

rolando-perez-the-electric-comedy-2000“Confronting not the papacy but the postmodern world of the Internet and global economics, this collection of satirical poems inspired by Dante’s Inferno explores the comic and tragic realities of contemporary life. At times graphic and abrasive, the language and style in this stirring collection mirrors the violence and social fragmentation that it describes. The imagined thoughts and interests of Dante as he composed the Inferno infuse this edgy, inventive collection that invites readers to participate in the creation of new mythologies that draw from the wisdom of the past.”    —Google Books