Rice & Beans Orchestra: “Dante’s Inferno” (2006)

Disco group Rice & Beans Orchestra released album “Dante’s Inferno” in 2006, though it was originally made in 1976. The album is a disco interpretation of Dante’s Inferno: “a disco-era extravaganza inspired by Dante’s Divine Comedy“.

Rice and Beans Orchestra

Click here to listen to the first part of “Dante’s Inferno” on YouTube.

Umberto Eco, Sator arepo eccetera (2006)

Sator-arepo-eccIn 2006, Umberto Eco published a short collection of playful literary experiments, including rewritings of some of the most famous passages of the Divine Comedy. In these rewritings, Eco reverses the meaning of each word, rendering an entirely new meaning to the whole. Here is one example, taken from the first verses of the Comedy:

“Nel mezzo del cammin di nostra vita,
mi ritrovai per una selva oscura,
ché la diritta via era smarrita.”

Eco’s version:

“Al margin del ristar di vostra morte
mi persi in un deserto illuminato,
ritrovando le piazze più distorte.”

For more examples, see Cinzia Rosati’s review.

Murder By Death, In Bocca al Lupo (2006)

murder-by-death-coverIn May 2006, Indiana-based indie-rock/rockabilly group Murder By Death released In Bocca al Lupo, a concept album influenced by Dante’s Comedy. Asked about the connection to Dante’s poem, band front man Adam Turla explained, “In Bocca is a collection of short stories and each song deals with the idea of sin in a different way.” Each track narrates the story of a different character, woven through a pastiche of musical styles and exploring various aspects of sin, death, and transgression.

Read Marisa Brown’s review of the album at AllMusic.com, and Adam Turla’s full interview with Bobby Gorman of ThePunkSite.com here.

Giulio Leoni, Dante Novels

leoni-medusaFirst in a series of historical thrillers featuring Dante Alighieri as investigator of crimes in 14th century Florence, the other novels are I delitti del mosaico; I delitti della luce; and La crociata delle tenebre.

See Internet Bookshop for more information.

leoni dante

Contributed by Piergiorio Niccolazzini, PNLA Literary Agency

A Divine Dessert

a-divine-dessert-inferno-cake-what-cakes-may-come-flickr.jpg

This delicious version of Dante’s Inferno was found on the “What Cakes May Come” Flickr page.

Contributed by Gretchen Williams (Bowdoin ’14)

Amy Bloom, “La Divina Commedia” (2006)

amy-bloom-la-divina-commedia-2006This anthology of some 20 short pieces focuses on each of the contributors’ most memorable meals. In La Divina Commedia Amy Bloom recounts her quest for the ultimate lasagna, recoiling in horror from the oxymoronic “dieter’s lasagna.” She writes: “I am looking for the perfect lasagna, making my way through cookbooks at midnight, ready for heartbreak but hopeful, like Dante seeking Beatrice.” [. . .]    —Amy Bloom

Dai Dudu, Li Tiezi, and Zhang An, Discussing the Divine Comedy with Dante (2006)

dai-dudu-li-tiezi-and-zhang-an-discussing-the-divine-comedy-with-dante-2006
“This extraordinary painting depicting 103 figures from world history in striking detail has become the latest internet hit.

“Message boards have erupted with contests to identify all those featured, who range from instantly recognisable figures like Gandhi to some more obscure figures such as Liu Xiang, the Chinese hurdler who limped out of the Beijing Olympics in the summer.

“An element of mystery also surrounds that origins of the picture, which appears to have drawn inspiration from Raphael’s Renaissance fresco The School of Athens. [. . .]

“Another clue comes from the three undistinguished men in contemporary dress who survey the scene from behind a wall at the top right of the picture.

“Internet detectives have identified these three as little-known Chinese/Taiwanese artists named as Dudu, Li Tiezi, and Zhang An.

“They created the oil painting – titled Discussing the Divine Comedy with Dante – in 2006, although it has only become a viral internet hit in the past few weeks.

“Alastair Sooke, art writer at The Daily Telegraph, said that the work reflected a trend of contemporary Chinese artists adopting Western styles and subjects.

“‘But the Dante reference makes us wonder whether we are looking at some nether-circle deep inside the Inferno: this is a vision of Celebrity Hell,’ he added.”    —Matthew Moore, London Daily Telegraph, 16 March 2009

dai-dudu-li-tiezi-and-zhang-an-discussing-the-divine-comedy-with-dante-2006-crop Click here to view a high-resolution, annotated version of the painting. Dante may be seen with his Commedia in the upper right hand corner of the painting, standing among the three artists.

“Dr. Who: The Impossible Planet & The Satan Pit” (2006)

dr-who-the-impossible-planet-the-satan-pit-2006Second series of Doctor Who, Episodes 8 and 9: The Impossible Planet and The Satan Pit

Tangerine Dream, Divina Commedia Albums (2002, 2004, 2006)

tangerine-dream-inferno

See Discogs for information on albums Inferno, Purgatorio, and Paradiso.

Contributed by Joe Henderson (Bowdoin, ’10)

Christian Anthony, “And Everything In Between” (2006)

christian-anthony-and-everything-in-between

“In his video short, Christian Anthony has appropriated film and television clips creating a collage of images and scenes describing the afterlife. These fragments, taken from the last several decades, emphasize the tension between the media-driven, pop culture representations of heaven, hell and purgatory and people’s personal perceptions of these concepts. Anthony’s portrait of the collective afterlife is at times comic, violent and wicked as it tosses up stereotypes, self-righteousness and fear.”    —San Jose Institute of Contemporary Art

Watch the video here.