“Foxtrot” by Bill Amend (December 2006)

foxtrot-by-bill-amend-dec-2006

Contributed by Charlie Russell-Schlesinger (Bowdoin, ’08)

Chris Sullivan, “Dante’s Divine Comedy” (2006)

chris-sullivan-dantes-divine-comedy-2006
Photo by Chris Sullivan

Anna Booth, “Inf. XXVI” (2006)

anna-booth-inf-xxvi-2006
Photo by Anna Booth

Beatrice in “A Series of Unfortunate Events”

beatrice-in-a-series-of-unfortunate-eventsBeatrice is the name of a mysterious character in the children’s book series, A Series of Unfortunate Events by Lemony Snicket. Beatrice does not appear in the main series, though she is often mentioned by the narrator as a lost love and, according to Lemony Snicket: The Unauthorized Autobiography, is the reason Snicket started writing the Baudelaires’ story. A 2006 spin-off book, The Beatrice Letters, sheds light on her story.
She is thought by many to be named for Beatrice Portinari, the beloved of the poet Dante, who spurned him and then died young. He devoted his Divine Comedy to her, and in it she figures as his muse and personal saviour. She arranges for his journey through the afterlife and guides him through heaven.” (retrieved on Dec 12, 2006)

Contributed by Kate Moon (Bowdoin, ’09)

“Dante Beatrix”

dante-beatrix-baby-bags-new-york

Beatrix New York

Jennifer Strange, “Inspired by Dante: An Artist’s Journey Through The Divine Comedy”

jennifer-strange-inspired-by-dante

Learn more at Inspired by Dante.

Contributed by Jennifer Strange

Dante and Swan

dante-and-swan

Contributed by Richard Abrams

Verbi Italiani

verbi-italiani-logo

Contributed by Sam Donovan (Bowdoin, ’07)

Barbara Reynolds, Dante: The Poet, the Political Thinker, the Man (2006)

barbara-reynolds-dante-the-poet-the-thinker-the-man-2006“. . .But the novelties come thick and fast, beginning (so far as I was concerned) with the suggestion on page 10 that Dante and other poets he associated with in Florence as a young man might have given their visionary and dreamlike imaginings a boost with the stimulus of love-potions. These herbal stimulants, cannabis perhaps, may, it turns out later, be what Dante is referring to in the comparison, near the start of Paradiso, between his own ‘trans-human’ experience and what Glaucus felt ‘on tasting of the herb’ (nel gustar dell’erba) which made him into a sea-god. As Reynolds explains at greater length when she comes to the final vision of the Godhead, mystics did often use drugs of one kind or another in conjunction with fasting and meditation in their pursuit of visionary illumination. There is no reason, she argues, why Dante should not have done so too. Dante as a substance abuser? It is not a key argument and Reynolds may be being provocative, even mischievous. She herself gives much more importance to her decoding of the two prophecies that have always been a problem for Dante commentators. . .”    –Peter Hainsworth, The Times Literary Supplement, October 18, 2006 (accessible only with a subscription)

Contributed by Jenny Davidson

“My First Day in Hell”

jack-handey-my-first-day-in-hell“It is odd, but Hell can be a lonely place, even with so many people around. They all seem caught up in their own little worlds, running to and fro, wailing and tearing at their hair. You try to make conversation, but you can tell they are not listening.” [. . .]    –Jack Handey, The New Yorker, October 30, 2006

Contributed by Darren Fishell (Bowdoin, ’09)