Hatsune Miku DIVINE-神曲- Xenon-P (2011)

“Ready for some history? How about the Vocaloid clan teaching you the history? These sets of songs come from Dante Alighieri’s most famous writing, The Divine Comedy.” [. . .]    –Demosthenes Alathea on VocaloiDemo, 2016

The tracklist for the album includes:

  1. Introduction –A Seed of Life-
  2. HIMAWARI
  3. Buy Them All
  4. Tatoo
  5. Eat Them All On The Table
  6. Hand To Hand
  7. Incubus
  8. Immortal Soul
  9. Rain of Tears
  10. Survive
  11. Come La Divina Commedia
  12. Birthday

You can purchase the album on Amazon.

Contributed by Savannah Mikus (FSU 2020)

Dante’s 10th Circle of Hell: Garbage Disposals

“My ‘duh!’ advice to every garbage disposal owner? Keep small metal objects FAR FAR AWAY from your sink. And, of course, always double check your garbage disposal before running it.With a fine tooth comb and a magnifying glass. ALWAYS.

“It took Stephen over an hour to pry Abe loose using a flashlight and a variety of tools. He had to detach the garbage disposal from the sink because the penny was lodged standing up against the inner wall of the garbage disposal and was nearly impossible to reach.

“Once he finally got it out, he tossed the penny to me and said, ‘I think Dante forgot to include a tenth circle of Hell for people who drop tiny metal objects into garbage disposals.'” [. . .]    –Caroline Meyers, Ye Olde Sanwich Shoppe, May 2, 2011.

The Dante Trap by Arnaud Delalande (2011)

“Murder follows murder, each more gruesome than the last, and as Viravolta begins to draw the connections between these deaths, and the torments reserved for sinners in each of Dante’s circles of hell, he finds himself embroiled in a terrible game of cat and mouse. As the streets of Venice fill with masked Carnival-goers, and as Anna and Viravolta are once again thrown together, he is drawn further into the inferno, to the heart of a secret sect and a plot to bring about the downfall of the city.” —Orion Books

Contributed by Alessandra Mazzocchi (Florida State University ’19)

“Per me si va…” Gates of Hell Tattoo

Gates-of-Hell-Dantes-Inferno-Tattoo

Image posted on CheckOutMyInk.com.

Magnificent Century, Season 1 (2011)

In Season 1, Episode 14 of  Magnificent Century, Concierge Ibrahim is seen to be reading the Divine Comedy in his office.

Contributed by David Francis

Daily Dante Blog

“Welcome to Daily Dante, a blogging adventure that follows the pilgrim Dante through his journey to hell and back, as we savor the poet Dante’s masterpiece The Divine Comedy.

Daily-Dante-Lenten-Spiritual-Discipline-BlogDaily Dante is a collaborative blog, written by a motley band of Dantophiles living in the Princeton, NJ area. We began during Lent of 2010, when we adopted blogging as a Lenten discipline: a canto a day (excepting Sundays, which technically do not count as Lent), which conveniently allowed us to finish more or less just before Easter. We have completed Inferno, and Purgatorio, and finished blogging through Paradiso during Lent 2012.” — homepage of Daily Dante: Dante as Lenten Spiritual Discipline

 

The Purgatory Home Companion, Mark Abramson and Rob K (2011)

Rob_K-Purgatory-Home-Companion-Mark-Abramson

“The Purgatory Home Companion is an album of music based on Dante’s Purgatorio by trash-blues artist Rob K, which I co-wrote and produced. [. . .]

“The Purgatory Home Companion was a collaborative project which worked as follows: Rob and I sent a request to all the musicians and some of the artists that we know to send us music, noise or spoken word recordings. Some of the contributions were from established artists, like Mark Lindsay of Paul Revere and the Raiders, and Jon Spencer of the Blues Explosion. Some were from our less well known but still talented friends. We received over 100 of these audio contributions. Rob and I organized them, built audio collages from them. I wrote the music around the collaged framework, and Rob wove in the lyrics which were based on his take on Purgatorio.”   — Mark Abramson of Zen Jam Graphic Design and Art Direction Studios

Photo credit Mark Stalnaker.

McSweeney’s: “The Nine Circles of Adjunct Hell.” (2011)

Internet TendencyMcSweeney’s Internet Tendency is the daily humor website of McSweeney’s Publishing, a publishing house founded by David Eggers in San Francisco. Dan Moreau of McSweeney’s Internet Tendency has written this satirical piece referencing the nine circles of Dante’s hell.

Among the circles are: Paper Grading, Classroom Observation, and Parking.

Click here to read the entire piece.

 

Contributed by Humberto González Chávez.

 

Clifford Anderson, Score for “The Divine Comedy” exhibit at the Harvard School of Design (2011)

cliff“I created the musical score for four short films about The Divine Comedy, an exhibition at the Harvard Graduate School of Design featuring new works by acclaimed international artists Olafur Eliasson, Ai Weiwei, and Tomas Saraceno.

“Working with filmmaker Rob Meyer (who received an Honorable Mention at the Sundance Film Festival), I composed a musical accompaniment for videos of each of the three installations plus a curatorial overview.

“It was a wonderful experience collaborating with the filmmaker and The Divine Comedy team at the GSD. The exhibition website at thedivinecomedy.org contains the full videos and the official information. Below, I’ve included my personal thoughts on the individual works and my experiences composing for the films.”    –Clifford Anderson, Armor-Plated Dove Productions

Smetana, Sibelius, and the Dante Quartet

smetana-sibelius-and-the-dante-quartet“Though both Jean Sibelius and Bedrich Smetana are well-known for their contributions to the nationalistic movements in their respective countries, the semi-autobiographical quartets of both composers (two for Smetana, one for Sibelius) instead focus on dark, tragic aspects of their own lives. Smetana’s quartets highlight some of the positive events in his life, but are more a representation of the gradual march toward deafness and the decline of his career. Sibelius, who struggled with depression and isolation, writes an equally revealing depiction of his more private inner turmoil. Performing these three emotionally charged works is the equally emotive, demonstrative Dante Quartet. Conceptually, its playing is ideal for showing listeners the very raw emotions present in these scores.” [. . .]    –Mike D. Brownell, Allmusic