PhD Comics, Dante’s Inferno (Academic Edition)

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Contributed by Natalie L. Berkman

McSweeney’s: “The Nine Circles of Adjunct Hell.” (2011)

Internet TendencyMcSweeney’s Internet Tendency is the daily humor website of McSweeney’s Publishing, a publishing house founded by David Eggers in San Francisco. Dan Moreau of McSweeney’s Internet Tendency has written this satirical piece referencing the nine circles of Dante’s hell.

Among the circles are: Paper Grading, Classroom Observation, and Parking.

Click here to read the entire piece.

 

Contributed by Humberto González Chávez.

 

Dante Digitized: Debates in the Digital Humanities, ed. Matthew Gold (2012)

Debates“From defining what a digital humanist is and determining whether the field has (or needs) theoretical grounding, to discussions of coding as scholarship and trends in data-driven research, this cutting-edge volume delineates the current state of the digital humanities and envisions potential futures and challenges.” [ . . . ] — DH Debates Website

For more information about the volume and the 2013 open-access edition, click here.

“Dante’s Tenth Circle” by Deborah Tennen

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In Ravenna, Italy, archivists recently discovered a lost canto of Dante’s Inferno — what appears to be the tenth circle of Hell. The ninth circle was previously understood to be the lowest point of Hell reached by Dante and his guide Virgil before ascending on their journey toward Paradise. A portion of the 14th-century manuscript, translated into English prose, is reproduced below.
‘Virgil,’ I cried, ‘Those shades–burning, immersed in human excrement, trapped in icy waters. I thought I had witnessed the basest of all sinners. So who are these figures I now see? Do my eyes betray me, or are their heads fully absorbed in the derrières of others? And who are these individuals whose bottoms are swollen due to the immense size of the heads there immersed?’ [. . .]    –Deborah Tennen, McSweeney’s Internet Tendency, October 25, 2012

Contributed by Steve Bartus (Bowdoin, ’07)