Fantasia (1940)

“The last segment of the 1940 movie Fantasia features the devil Chernabog who awakes on Bald Mountain and is seen torturing restless souls and throwing them into a fiery volcano.  What I particularly love about that piece is that Chernabog is banished by the chorus of monks chanting Ave Maria as the journey into the nearby cathedral.”    -Samuel Gray

(Contributed by Samuel Gray, University of Mary Washington, ’18)

Homer Simpson’s Donut Hell

Hell-Ironic-Punishments-Division-Door-SimpsonsThe Simpsons’ “Treehouse of Horror IV” (S05E05): after losing his soul to the devil in a bargain over a donut, Homer is subjected to punishments in Hell’s “Ironic Punishments Division,” where the demon in charge of force-feeding him donuts is astonished at his capacity.

See a clip from the episode on YouTube.

See also the action figure released by MacFarlane Toys (pictured below).

Donut-Hell-Ironic-Punishment-Simpsons

Dante as guide in “Coco” (2017)

Miguel and Dante

 

[…] “Miguel, the 12-year-old protagonist of ‘Coco,’ embarks on such a quest. Along with his companion, a stray dog fittingly named Dante, he treks through the underworld while facing obstacles and bad omens that pop up constantly. (In Spanish ‘coco’ means ‘boogeyman,’ which is a nickname for the devil.) But since this is a children’s movie, the challenges bring laughter, which isn’t altogether alien to Mexico’s approach to death. To laugh at death in Mexico is to be courageous.” […]    –Ilan Stavans, The New York Times, December 11, 2017

Dino Di Durante, Inferno: The Art Collection (2014)

DinoDiDuranteDino Di Durante’s life’s work, passion, and assistance from a committee of Dante experts helped guide his hand through his contemporary paintings, inspired to educate the world about Dante and his Divine Comedy.

“Boris [Acosta]’s documentary feature film (Inferno by Dante) will screen at Cannes Film Festival in May 2016, and Dino Di Durante’s 72-piece art collection has been published as a book on Amazon [. . .] Each painting comes with a description of the passage at the bottom of each page as well as QR Codes to be scanned to read the actual text for free online while enjoying the art itself. Inferno: The Art Collection as the book is titled, is already translated in 33 languages, with more to come.” — Review: “Dante’s Inferno Gets Repainted” on Thalo: Artist Community

See the related post on Dino Di Durante and Boris Acosta’s Dante’s Inferno Animated here.

Divine Comédie, Simon Côté-Lapointe (2014)

Purgatoire-Divine-Comedie-Simon-Cote-Lapointe-film

Divine Comédie is an experimental film released in 2014, featuring music and video imagery by Simon Côté-Lapointe. The artist himself describes the film as follows: “This adaptation of Dante Divine Comédie is a oniric musical trip without words, a thrilling experimental mix of animation, video art and imagination combining 2D and 3D animation, video art and puppetry as well as electronic, electroacoustic and acoustic music.”

The trailer and two versions of the film (both the full-length film and a shorter version) are available to watch on YouTube.

For more information on the film and its creators, see the website here.

Contributed by Simon Côté-Lapointe, Université de Montréal

Over the Garden Wall (2014)

Over the Garden WallOver the Garden Wall is a cartoon mini-series on Cartoon Network, based on Patrick McHale’s short animated film Tome of the Unknown. It centers on a young poet, Wirt, and his half-brother Greg, as they travel through a dark forest called “The Unknown”. They are accompanied by a talking bluebird named Beatrice.  The mini-series has ten episodes; the latter nine loosely correspond to the circles of hell in Dante’s Inferno.

Visit this site for a closer look at the correspondences between the Inferno and Over the Garden Wall.

To visit the show’s blog on Cartoon Network, click here.

Contributed by Kate Peterson

over-the-garden-wall-image-5-620x400

Futurama, “Hell is Other Robots” (1999)

Futurama

In the ninth episode of Season One of Matt Groening’s Futurama, the robot Bender is condemned to Hell after violating his contract with the Temple of Robotology.  In their search for Bender, his friends track his scent to the Inferno ride at Reckless Ted’s Funland.  Meanwhile, the Robot Devil leads Bender around the circles of Robot Hell in a song.  The Devil explains: “We know all your sins, Bender, and for each one we have prepared an agonizing and ironic punishment.”

Click here for more information about the episode.

Watch the video clip of the Robot Devil’s song here.

Dante’s Fire-Con

dantes-fire-con“With “Geek!” the playwright Crystal Skillman and the troupe Vampire Cowboys fly high the freak flag of fantasy. An ode to fangirls and fanboys, the show, in Cowboys tradition, celebrates the universe of anime, comics, science fiction, manga and Hollywood effects spectaculars. It’s a milieu Ms. Skillman clearly knows well and depicts with affection. At an Ohio anime convention called Dante’s Fire-Con two fans take on the guises of their fictional heroines…” [. . .]    –Andy Webster, New York Times, March 29, 2013

See also: Incubator Arts Project, New York

Dino Di Durante, “Dante’s Inferno Animated” (2012)

dino-di-durante-dantes-inferno-animated-2012

Dante’s Inferno Animated is a film created with children in mind to give them the opportunity to learn Dante’s teachings about life while they grow up. The images are as compelling as the story itself.
The film tells Dante Alighieri’s journey through the first part of the afterlife, Inferno. It is organized circle by circle and recited in primitive Italian in Dante’s own words. Dante is guided by his hero Virgil through each circle of Hell and their subdivisions until they reach the center of the Earth and emerged to the other hemisphere into Purgatory.
It features over 50 original color illustrations from the upcoming Dante’s Inferno comic book and magazine series, put together in a series of animation clips that will delight a young as well as an older audience. All the images used in this animation film were originally created byDino Di Durante with the collaboration of Awik Balaian and Riccardo Patesi, under the artistic direction of Boris Acosta. It is worth clarifying that this film is not a cartoon, but an ‘animation’ that is recited, instead of spoken by the animated characters. In other words, there are no speaking characters, but only their motion with the recitation that accompanies the action seen in the film.”    —Dante’s Inferno Animated

Contributed by Sam Woodworth

Full Metal Alchemist

full-metal-alchemist“In the TV show ‘Full Metal Alchemist’ there is a character named Dante and she controls beings known as Homunculi, or fake people. There are seven Homunculi and each is named after one of the deadly sins.”    –Andrea Beauvais

See more information on Wikia.

Contributed by Andrea Beauvais (Luther College)