“La Divina Commedia”: ceramic artist Lee Yun Hee

“Lee Yun Hee weaves Eastern and Western influences to offer a contemporary re-interpretation of both aesthetic and literary traditions, constructing a fantasy world that speaks of hope, strength and determination.

“Young ceramic artist Lee Yun Hee (b. 1986, South Korea) majored in Ceramics at both BFA and MFA levels at Seoul’s Hong Ik University. Lee calls herself a collector. What she collects are everyday stories of the common people, about their desires and wants, their fears and anxiety, and ultimately ‘the cure’ they seek to overcome the challenges and difficulties of life. There is much that she can relate to during her collections, for she is after all also human. Yet, it is not the hardships she clings to, but those ‘cures’ that each person resorts to. [. . .]

“Lee created her latest series entitled ‘La Divina Commedia‘ in 2013. Her inspiration came from Divina Commedia (Divine Comedy), the renowned 14th century epic poem by Italian poet and writer Dante Alighieri. The literary work recounts Dante’s travels through Hell, Purgatory and Paradise. In Lee’s contemporary take, the heroine of the story is a young girl who runs against all odds to overcome the trials and tribulations of life.” [. . .]   —Art Radar, August 11, 2015.

To view more of Lee’s ceramic artwork, you can visit her website.

Contributed by Anita Verna Crofts.

Cheryl Sorg’s Nine Circles of Hell

Dante’s Inferno, cut apart line by line and assembled in readable order with clear tape onto a series of nine plexi circles approximately 20 inches in diameter and mounted onto a floor-to-ceiling height clear plexi road going through the centers of the discs.”    –Cheryl Sorg, from her website, 2019.

Cheryl Sorg is an artist from Cincinnati, Ohio, and currently based in Boston. She specializes in street art, collages, tape drawings, and photography, among other mediums.

To view more of Sorg’s artwork, you can visit her website.

Nathan W. Pyle’s Comic

Nathan W. Pyle is an author and illustrator based in New York City. He is best known for his book NYC Basic Tips and Etiquette (2014), and his comic series Strange Planet.

You can check out more of Pyle’s work by following him on Instagram, Facebook, and by visiting his website. Additionally, Pyle is releasing a book of Strange Planet comics later this year, which you can check out on Amazon.

Contributed by Dariella Fonseca (Florida State University ’20).

Kathia Recio’s #Dante2018 Illustrations

Kathia Recio is a graphic artist from Mexico City. During the #Dante2018 social media movement, Recio created a series of illustrations for the Divine Comedy. Pictured above are a few of her illustrations, which you can view on her Instagram. Clockwise from the top left, this the link to the first illustration, the second illustration, the third illustration, and the fourth illustration.

You can check out more of Kathia Recio’s work on her Instagram and on her website.

See other posts related to #Dante2018 here.

Contributed by Pablo Maurette (Florida State University)

Florencia Gutman’s Artwork for Purgatorio 33

Florencia Gutman is an illustrator and graphic designer based in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Her work has been published in a number of outlets, such as La Nación newspaper, Adn Cultura, and Anfibia digital magazine, among numerous others. As part of the #Dante2018 social media movement, Gutman created the above illustration for Purgatorio 33.

To check out more of Gutman’s stunning work, you can follow her on Facebook, Behance, and you can visit her website.

See other posts related to #Dante2018 here.

Contributed by Pablo Maurette (Florida State University)

Sergio Ucedo’s #Dante2018 Artwork

Sergio Ucedo is an Argentine illustrator and graffiti artist. Ucedo created a number of striking art pieces during the #Dante2018 social media movement, such as the above piece promoting the hashtag. Ucedo also created the artwork below, which was featured in an article about #Dante2018 on Perfil.

To check out more of Ucedo’s artwork, you can follow him on Instagram and Twitter, and also visit his blog.

You can read the Perfil article that featured Ucedo’s artwork here.

See other posts related to #Dante2018 here.

Contributed by Pablo Maurette (Florida State University)

Esteban Serrano’s #Dante2018 Illustrations

Esteban Serrano is a designer and cartoonist, and also goes by Cien Perros online. During the #Dante2018 collective reading on social media, Serrano created a cartoon for each canto of the Divine Comedy. The artwork above are a few of Serrano’s illustrations. Clockwise from the top right is an illustration for Paradiso 26,  an illustration for Purgatorio 29, an illustration for Inferno 34, and an illustration for Inferno 24.

You can see all of Serrano’s illustrations for the Divine Comedy on Medium.

To check out more of Serrano’s artwork, you can follow him on Instagram and Twitter.

See other posts related to #Dante2018 here.

Contributed by Pablo Maurette (Florida State University)

Interview with Maru Ceballos

“De la mano artística de Maru Ceballos, y para todos aquellos fanáticos de Dante Alighieri y su Divina Comedia, llega una muestra súper interesante al Museo Mitre. Hasta el 10 mayo de este año se podrá visitar la obra ‘Los círculos del Dante: La Divina Comedia ilustrada por Maru Ceballos’. ¿En qué consiste la obra? En la ilustración de los 100 cantos de La Divina Comedia más los mapas correspondientes a cada cántica (Infierno, Purgatorio, Paraíso). A continuación, la palabra de la mismísima autora.

“Maru Ceballos y su idea de ‘Los círculos del Dante’

‘Me contactó Luciana Ferrazzi del Museo Mitre (habían visto la serie en redes sociales a través de la movida #Dante2018 que inició en Twitter Pablo Maurette). Fue así que me propusieron armarla en el marco de varias actividades que se realizarán alrededor de Dante y la Divina Comedia. Mitre fue un fanático de la obra y – creo – el primer traductor latinoamericano de esa obra en español’ [. . .]

“¿Quiénes pueden participar de esta obra?

Maru Ceballos explica que al tratarse de una obra con énfasis en los simbolismos, hay mucha crudeza y violencia visual. ‘Nada que no esté en los textos de la Divina Comedia”, aclara. “Supongo que no apunta a un público que guste de resoluciones visuales texto-imagen literales. No se van a encontrar a Dante de la mano con Virgilio, sino con un cúmulo de situaciones con énfasis en lo simbólico. Creo que apunta a un público curioso con ganas de ver una versión no tradicional de las ilustraciones de la obra de Dante’

[. . .]    –Julieta B. Mollo, .ITBuenosAires, March 14, 2018.

To view more of Maru Ceballos’ artwork, you can follow her on VSCO, Instagram, and Twitter.

See other posts related to #Dante2018 here.

Contributed by Pablo Maurette (Florida State University)

Maru Ceballos’ #Dante2018 Illustrations

Maru Ceballos is a visual artist known for her striking, inky, horror style. During the #Dante2018 social media initiative, Ceballos created a variety pieces based on the Divine Comedy, and her work was used as promotional art by Museo Mitre for their exhibition “Los círculos del Dante.” Pictured above are a few of her pieces from this series. Clockwise from the top right is an illustration for Paradiso, an illustration for Purgatorio, a portrait of Dante, and an illustration for Inferno.

To view more of Maru Ceballos’ artwork, you can follow her on VSCO, Instagram, and Twitter.

Relatedly, you can read an interview with Maru Ceballos here.

See other posts related to #Dante2018 here.

Contributed by Pablo Maurette (Florida State University)

“Wandering from the Straight Path of Clarity,” review of “The Divine Comedy: Heaven, Purgatory and Hell Revisited by Contemporary African Artists”

“You may feel, at times, as if you’ve been handed a map, and then told that the map may or may not be accurate, may or may not relate to anything in the real world, may or may not be entirely a fiction, or a random design concocted by some clever trickster to mislead you. That is how the title of a new show at the Smithsonian National Museum of African Art — ‘The Divine Comedy: Heaven, Purgatory and Hell Revisited by Contemporary African Artists’ — relates to the work on view, by more than 40 artists from 18 African countries.

“The exhibition is shoehorned into spaces not quite big enough for anything to breathe comfortably, filling temporary galleries, stairwells and passage spaces on four floors of the mostly subterranean museum. The current exhibition, curated by Simon Njami, is slightly smaller than the original Dante exhibition he presented in Frankfurt last spring, but it still sprawls, both in its physical layout (the route through its various rooms requires careful navigation) and intellectually.

“Consider one of the best works in the show, a large-scale drawing by Julie Mehretu, in which a finely etched suggestion of architectural facades is overlaid with a storm of delicate lines, smudges and erasures. In the catalogue, published in conjunction with the Frankfurt display, her work is listed as belonging to the ‘Purgatory’ part of the presentation; in Washington, it is in the ‘Inferno’ room. It isn’t the only work to migrate from one celestial realm to another, and those migrations suggest that the basic template borrowed from Dante is not to be taken too seriously.” […]    –Phillip Kennicott, The Washington Post, April 17, 2015

See also our post on the first iteration of Njami’s exhibition, featured at the Savannah College of Art and Design’s museum.