Dante’s 10th Circle of Hell: Garbage Disposals

“My ‘duh!’ advice to every garbage disposal owner? Keep small metal objects FAR FAR AWAY from your sink. And, of course, always double check your garbage disposal before running it.With a fine tooth comb and a magnifying glass. ALWAYS.

“It took Stephen over an hour to pry Abe loose using a flashlight and a variety of tools. He had to detach the garbage disposal from the sink because the penny was lodged standing up against the inner wall of the garbage disposal and was nearly impossible to reach.

“Once he finally got it out, he tossed the penny to me and said, ‘I think Dante forgot to include a tenth circle of Hell for people who drop tiny metal objects into garbage disposals.'” [. . .]    –Caroline Meyers, Ye Olde Sanwich Shoppe, May 2, 2011.

“Nine Circles of Subscription Hell”

Spiral-Inferno-Subscription-Service-Hell“Sometimes revenge is best served in literature. The poet Dante Alighieri, powerless against the forces that had exiled him from his native Florence, populated his vision of hell with proxies for his enemies. The resulting epic poem has become a masterwork in Italian literature. If only politics were so literate today!

[…]

“In that vein, here’s my own vision of Subscription Hell, reserved for those businesses that abuse the trust of their customers in increasingly despicable ways.

“Dante’s nine circles were: Limbo, lust, gluttony, greed, anger, heresy, violence, fraud, and treachery. My vision has similar circles, populated by businesses that have misled or disappointed their subscribers, whether through intention or accident.” — Anne Janzer, “Nine Circles of Subscription Hell,” on annejanzer.com (March 15, 2016)

 

Dante Illustrations by Robert Brinkerhoff

Robert Brinkerhoff, Professor of Illustration and Dean of Fine Arts at the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD), has embarked on what he calls “an ambitious undertaking, to say the least“: he proposes to illustrate the Comedy in 100 canto-by-canto drawings. The Inferno illustrations will be completed in December 2017, with Purgatorio and Paradiso projected for a future date. In January 2017, he began blogging the Inferno illustrations on his personal blog Brinkerhoff Brimmeth Over.

Robert-Brinkerhoff-Old-Man-Crete-Inferno-Illustrations

Of the project, he writes, “Most of us read L’Inferno in high school or freshman lit classes in college, and its pulpy, phantasmal imagery appeals universally to youthful sensibilities. I last encountered L’Inferno (sans the rest of the poem) at age 19, my mind mired in newfound pleasures of freely available sex and beer and (finally, after 12 years of public school in which art class was shoved to the periphery) full-time dedication to art making. But in middle age I suspect the poem resonates more profoundly as it mirrors the preoccupations of people (like myself) whose paths in life are pondered with affection, regret, lost love, resentment and a desire to clarify, once and for all, the rest of the journey. Pick up Dante at age 50 and it will be a different literary experience. Spend many hours translating and drawing its tercets of terza rima and you’ll realize how much you have in common with a 14th century poet, despite the hundreds of years and linguistic traditions that separate you.” — Robert Brinkerhoff, “Introduction to Inferno: Una Selva Oscura,” Brinkerhoff Brimmeth Over, January 18, 2017

See his Divine Comedy images and follow the updates on his blog.

Daily Dante Blog

“Welcome to Daily Dante, a blogging adventure that follows the pilgrim Dante through his journey to hell and back, as we savor the poet Dante’s masterpiece The Divine Comedy.

Daily-Dante-Lenten-Spiritual-Discipline-BlogDaily Dante is a collaborative blog, written by a motley band of Dantophiles living in the Princeton, NJ area. We began during Lent of 2010, when we adopted blogging as a Lenten discipline: a canto a day (excepting Sundays, which technically do not count as Lent), which conveniently allowed us to finish more or less just before Easter. We have completed Inferno, and Purgatorio, and finished blogging through Paradiso during Lent 2012.” — homepage of Daily Dante: Dante as Lenten Spiritual Discipline

 

Mallory Ortberg, “Dante Casually Running Into Beatrice In Art History”

dante6-e1441675494898-800x0-c-default

oh hello sorry, i didn’t see you there, ladies was so busy reading my book here hello, beverly oh, Beatrice, you say? I forgot I meet so many women and learn their names on a daily basis, you know hard to remember all of them

 

[…]

dante8

hi i’m so sorry to bother you it’s me Dante Alighieri from life? from being alive? we met that one time when you were eight and then I saw you again briefly nine years later and then you died after you married someone else? idk if you remember me anyhow my plan was sort of just to follow you around for eternity, heaven-wise i hope that’s cool with you? are these your friends? cool cool

See more: Mallory Ortberg, The Toast, September 8, 2015

The Eleventh Circle of Hell

“Hi. We are a married couple, let’s call us Sally and Jimmy. We’re going to write about the messed up insane treatment my family receives from my extended family – mother, father, sister + son. This is Jimmy, by the way.

“Tonight, I was at work. Sally picked me up and was crying. Our car had broken down at a friend’s house last night.

“This morning was hell; our son was very hard to deal with getting ready for school. then there’s the guilt my mom throws in about getting the kid a haircut. She paid for my sister’s son’s haircut; took him there, too. She didn’t offer the same for our son.” — TYPEOGRAPHIE, The Eleventh Circle, September 4, 2014

Read the rest of the article here.

Nine Levels of Work Hell

“Mind-numbing meetings, overflowing inboxes and urgent projects that require you to drop everything–do ever feel like parts of your workday are a personalized form of hell? If you’re frustrated by ineffective work processes–and complaining to coworkers over drinks–you’re not alone … After surveying approximately 1,000 AtTask.com users, Nielson identified nine levels of “work hell,” those things that irritate people most. He shares the levels and offers solutions for eliminating the suffering.” — Stephanie Vozza, Fast Company, February 20, 2014

Read the full article here.

McSweeney’s: “The Nine Circles of Adjunct Hell.” (2011)

Internet TendencyMcSweeney’s Internet Tendency is the daily humor website of McSweeney’s Publishing, a publishing house founded by David Eggers in San Francisco. Dan Moreau of McSweeney’s Internet Tendency has written this satirical piece referencing the nine circles of Dante’s hell.

Among the circles are: Paper Grading, Classroom Observation, and Parking.

Click here to read the entire piece.

 

Contributed by Humberto González Chávez.

 

“Failure Pile in a Sadness Bowl”: Dante as Inspiration for Creative Writers

FailurePile“If you ever feel bad about your own writing, just remember that one of the world’s most well-known works of classic literature is self-insert fanfiction where the author hangs out with his favorite poet and is guided on his journey of discovery by a Manic Pixie Dream Girl version of a woman he met twice.”    —“Failure pile in a sadness bowl,” Mister-Smalls, Tumblr, February 2014

Contributed By Victoria Rea-Wilson (Bowdoin, ’14)

“Kindred Spirits: A Juxtaposition of Dante & Dickens”

dante-and-scrooge“. . . I cannot recall a time when I didn’t know the story of A Christmas Carol. The images and themes have delighted or haunted me since my childhood, either in the form of the ‘Dickens Village’ adventure at the mall or the hundredth or so viewing of the Muppet version. (Michael Caine, you will always be my Scrooge.) So when I studied Dante’s Commedia in college, it was no leap for me to recognize the countless similarities between the two stories. I would write C.C. in the margin every time I came across another bit of Dickens in Dante. At long last, I can pitch some these ideas to the wider world.”     –Kathyrn (blogger), Through a Glass Brightly, December 18, 2013

Contributed by Patrick Molloy