New England Winter Hell

new-england-circles-of-winter-hell-2016This cartoon by Beth Wolfensberger Singer summarizes the struggles of New Englanders during the winter season.

“Beth Wolfensberger Singer is a Boston-based artist. Her comics appear on her blog, ambitionectomy.tumblr.com.” — Singer, Boston Globe, December 16, 2016

Dante Gifts at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum

The Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston offers a number of Dante-related gifts in their online store, commemorating the museum’s manuscript editions of the poet’s works. See, for example, the Dante journal and the magnet bookmark set, both based on reproductions of one of the most beautiful manuscripts in the Gardner collection. The gifts also include a Dante ornament, pictured below.

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Cerberus Spotting (Jamaica Plain, Boston)

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Photo credit Alessio Tognetti

A power distribution box in Jamaica Plain, Boston, featuring a painting of Cerberus.

Contributed by Alessio Tognetti

Nine Circles of PR Hell

“For those PR professionals not involved in the candy, safety, party, and costume industries, what does Halloween mean for them? With everyone thinking of the underworld, it made me think about the venial and mortal sins that some PR professionals may commit as part of their daily practice of PR. In his Divine Comedy, Dante Alighieri wrote of the Nine Circles of Hell. That caused me to wonder – what are the nine circles of PR Hell?” — Mark W. McClennan, PRSA Boston, October 31, 2014

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Isabella Stuart Gardner Museum’s Café G

cafe-g-isabella-stuart-gardner-museumAn introductory note on the menu of the Isabella Stuart Gardner Museum’s Café G:

“Isabella Stuart Gardner’s love for the medieval extended to literature as well as to art, and she was particularly devoted to the great Italian poet Dante Alighieri (1265-1321). Gardner was a member of the Dante Society and collected several rare copies of the Divine Comedy, including a manuscript of the poem written within a century of the author’s death. She stored these precious books alongside a death mask of the poet in the ‘Dante Case’ in the museum’s Long Gallery. [. . .] We hope you enjoy this special menu, inspired by Inferno. It features fiery hot peppers in a variety of different forms.”    —Café G Menu (click to see full menu)

Contributed by Nancy Vickers

Dante Restaurant, Boston

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Dante Restaurant, Boston, MA

Contributed by Krista Gladman (Bowdoin, ’11)

Dante Alighieri Elementary School, Boston

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See more at Boston Public Schools.

Contributed by Elizabeth Baskerville

Matthew Pearl, “The Dante Club” (2003)

matthew-pearl-the-dante-club-2003“1865 Boston, a small group of literary geniuses puts the finishing touches on America’s first translation of The Divine Comedy and prepares to unveil the remarkable visions of Dante to the New World. The powerful old guard of Harvard College wants to keep Dante out–believing that the infiltration of such foreign superstitions onto our bookshelves would prove as corrupting as the foreign immigrants invading Boston harbor. The members of the Dante Club–poets and Harvard professors Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes, James Russell Lowell and publisher J. T. Fields –endure the intimidation of their fellow Boston Brahmins for a sacred literary cause, an endeavor that has sustained Longfellow in the hellish aftermath of his wife’s tragic death by fire.”    —Matthew Pearl

Neocommedia: Inferno, Purgatory, Paradise (2002)

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“An immersive adaptation of Dante’s Divine Comedy exploring the modern deity of Information.”    —iKatun

“iKatun’s Paradise is based on Dante’s Paradise from the Divine Comedy, however, this Paradise is not about perfect morality but about perfect information. iKatun’s Paradise alludes to instant availability and perfect knowledge; a single data point of infinite density; the faultless model of information to which all media systems aspire; the space where entropy does not exist.”    —iKatun