Dante in poster for HBO’s series, “Succession” (2019)

Image on wall is a painting entitled “Dante and Virgil” (1850) by William-Adolphe Bouguereau.  It appears to be the falsifiers of Inf. 30, Capocchio and Gianni Schicchi, in combat.

Contributed by Kristina Olson 

The original painting, currently held in the Musée d’Orsay in Paris, France, below.

Criminal Minds, “Burn” (S10E02)

Criminal_Minds_season_10_episode_2-Dante-Circles-Hell“There’s been a string of killings, from a drowning, to strangulation, to a hit and run. There seems to be no connection – except all the victims are fathers with sons the same age, and the killings are following the sins laid out in Dante’s Circle of Hell. Apparently, the UnSub has some serious daddy issues.” — CBS

During the episode, the killer hallucinates a voice repeatedly crying to him, “Abandon all hope, ye who enter here.”

Veiko Ounpuu, “The Temptation of St. Tony” (2010)

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“Bizarre and beautiful, disturbing and droll, The Temptation of St. Tony wonders what it means to be a good man. Kicking off with a quotation from Dante’s Inferno, this delirious sophomore feature from the Estonian filmmaker Veiko Ounpuu observes Tony (Taavi Eelmaa), a triumphantly depressed middle manager. Dissatisfied with his adulterous wife and a boss who orders him to sack all his factory workers, Tony descends into a midlife crisis that manifests itself as a series of increasingly hilarious, horrific visions.” [. . .]    –Jeannette Catsoulis, The New York Times, September 16, 2010

Joe Wright, “The Soloist” (2009)

joe-wright-the-soloist-2009The Soloist is a buddy movie with none of the usual grace notes of the genre, and the backdrop–a skid row seemingly conjured by Dante where legions of homeless lead a feral existence –is part of a Los Angeles few ever see. In his films Mr. Wright has displayed a remarkable visual facility, and The Soloist is no exception. Instead of hills and canyons, the city is rendered in soaring concrete, brutal poverty, scary dark nights and hard sunlight.” [. . .]    –David Carr, The New York Times, April 15, 2009

Federico Fellini, “Ginger e Fred” (1986)

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“In the opening scenes, a group of TV variety show guests and performers are riding in a van from Termini Station to the TV studio for the taping of the show. Playing on the video monitor in the the van is what appears to be a children’s show, featuring a Dante marionette who is lost in a dark forest. The sequence ends as Dante finds a compass and happily walks home.”    –Roy Scarbrough

Contributed by Roy Scarbrough

“Hannibal” (Ridley Scott, 2001)

hannibal-ridley-scott-2001Hannibal is set in Florence where the notorius Hannibal Lecter is posing as a medievalist and Dante scholar. He lectures on the Divine Comedy and recites poetry from the Vita nuova, as well as attends an operatic adaptation of the Vita nuova. Apart from these explicit references to Dante, there is also a sense in which the homicidal methods he employs mirror, contrapasso like, the sins of his victims, all of whom are in some sense bad. The noble folk, Starling and a nurse, are spared, despite HL’s ample oppourtunities to kill them. It is difficult to equate any of the movie’s characters with those of the Divine Comedy, although Lector does in a sense play Virgil to Starling’s pilgrim; but in his role as avenger of evil, serial killer, HL appears more like the wrathful Old Testament God.”    –Peter Schwindt

For a compilation of references to Dante in the film, see the post on the website greatdante.net.

Contributed by Peter Schwindt