Lucifer in Hell T-Shirt

“From a version of Dante’s Inferno is this demonically inspiring image of Lucifer in therionic (beast-like) form, Cornelius Galle presents the primal Satanic strength and predatory power of Lucifer devouring souls in the frozen lake of Hell.”    –LApotheca, Etsy

See more from LApotheca on Etsy.

“Climate Scientists’ Road to Hell”

“Limbo: Reserved for those who observe the mess that climate science has become, subservient as it is to politics, and wonder whether redemption and a return to a true science-serving path is ever possible.

[. . .]

“Sixth Circle: Miscreants in the Sixth Circle of Hell should be forced to sit while unable to move or speak and repeatedly watch others being lauded in their place for their work, stolen and used without attribution.”    –Anthony Watts, WUWT, December 27, 2012

Kid Eternity (2006)

Comics visionary Grant Morrison reimagines the unique character of Kid Eternity, a young man who died before his true time and returns to Earth as a ghostly spirit, along with his guardian Mister Keeper. In this 144-page trade paperback, illustrated by Duncan Fegredo, Kid Eternity follows the terrifying night of aspiring stand-up comedian Jerry Sullivan as he joins Kid Eternity on a quest to free his Keeper from Hell.”    —Goodreads

Photo courtesy of Bob Mitchell.

Dante in the “friend-zone”

Denton Designs’ Dante’s Inferno (1986)

“With only one life, this is quite an unforgiving game. Nevertheless, it’s overall pretty nice to play, albeit short. The best feature is the creepy atmosphere, which captures fairly well the one of the book, of a place actually more desolate and sorrowful than plain scary.”    — User Demon, Lemon64, June 1, 2015

Denton Designs’ 1986 video game, Dante’s Inferno, for the Commodore 64.

Watch Retro Arcade Classics complete the game here.

Anarchy Online – Pandemonium

pandemonium-anarchy-online

Pandemonium is the highest-level zone in Shadowlands, Funcom’s 2003 expansion for its 2001 MMORPG Anarchy Online.

 

Its four parts are named after the four parts of the Ninth Circle of Hell: Caïna, Antenora, Ptolomaea, Judecca.

 

Learn more about Anarchy Online here.

Real Places on Earth That Lead to the Gates of Hell

“Hell on Earth: A concept that has fascinated many for millennia, an attempt to place divine punishment on the same plane of existence humans live in. [. . .] Religions across the world speak of portals that connect the living with the dead and the terrible creatures that guard this fiery pit. Where are these gates to Hell?

[. . .]

“Along the road of Lake Averno in Italy, we find one of the oldest roads that lead to the underworld. Over two thousand years ago, Grotto della Sibilla was once a Roman military tunnel connecting Lake Averno to Lake Lucrino. Here, Aeneas with Sibyl at his side embarked on a journey into Hades.    —Eduardo Limón, Cultura Colectiva, August 2, 2016

Dave Sim’s Cerebus in Hell? (2017)

“The first new Cerebus comic since 2004! Where has Cerebus been since he died twelve years ago? Is he in hell? Purgatory? Limbo?”    — Rich Johnston, Bleeding Cool, June 22, 2016

Check out Dave Sim’s Doré-inspired 2017 Cerebus in Hell? here.

To read about the controversy surrounding the title (“Cerebus” vs. “Cerberus”), see Rich Johnston’s blogposts here and here.

Nathan W. Pyle’s Comic

Nathan W. Pyle is an author and illustrator based in New York City. He is best known for his book NYC Basic Tips and Etiquette (2014), and his comic series Strange Planet.

You can check out more of Pyle’s work by following him on Instagram, Facebook, and by visiting his website. Additionally, Pyle is releasing a book of Strange Planet comics later this year, which you can check out on Amazon.

Contributed by Dariella Fonseca (Florida State University ’20).

Dante in poster for HBO’s series, “Succession” (2019)

Image on wall is a painting entitled “Dante and Virgil” (1850) by William-Adolphe Bouguereau.  It appears to be the falsifiers of Inf. 30, Capocchio and Gianni Schicchi, in combat.

Contributed by Kristina Olson 

The original painting, currently held in the Musée d’Orsay in Paris, France, below.