Istvan Madarassy, “Hungary Celebrates Dante” (2011)

istvan-madarassy-hungary-celebrates-dante-2011“The Hungarian artist Istvan Madarassy is considered one of the leading sculptors of copper in Europe, signed in the past, the restoration of the main sights of Budapest and was awarded the Medal of Merit by the President of the Republic of Hungary. Madarassy Istvan born in Budapest in 1948. And ‘member of the Academy of Sciences and Arts European Union with headquarters in Salzburg (Austria). In Italy, more precisely in Ravenna, his ‘Gates of Hell’, has received the gold medal of the Biennale Dante. His sculptures depicting St. Stephen King of Hungary and Queen Gisella, were presented to Pope John Paul II by the President of the Republic of Hungary Ferenc Madl. Another of his works is the UN. He has exhibited around the world, from Paris, London, New York, Tel Aviv, Vienna, Frankfurt and Milan. The artist presents a series of important Magyar His creations result of the precise ability to merge the hand with the technique: Madarassy it intervenes on the copper plate using a blowtorch, thus giving rise to images, changing landscapes and charming, with effects from aurora Northern Lights. In these works that could be called ‘pittosculture’ – showing the overlap of branches and twisted trees – pictures will be added from which peep heads and big hands, with vivid expression. In fact, while the hand is the means by which the artist creates, the mind and spirit are the crucible, the cradle of inspiration, where it begins the process of transformation and sublimation of matter. As a novice Demiurge, Madarassy soul infuses the matter, blowing a magical divine breath: copper so bitten by the fire, oxidized, shaped to life and soul liberating light and life.”    —Life Beyond Tourism November 11, 2011 (retrieved on December 14, 2011)

In collaboration with the Museo Casa di Dante, Florence, Italy.

Contributed by Patrick Molloy

Franz Liszt, “Dante Symphony” (1847-57)

franz-liszt-dante-symphony-1847-1857The Dante Symphony, by Franz Liszt, was written in two movements: Inferno, and Purgatorio – Magnificat. Liszt was told that he shouldn’t attempt to write a movement for Paradiso, as this was a hopeless venture. Nobody can put true heaven into a song.”    –Kevin Williams, January 26, 2008

Contributed by Kevin Williams (Luther College, ’11)

“Il Terzo Cerchio” Restaurant, Budapest, Hungary

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Il Terzo Cerchio, Budapest, Hungary