Kathia Recio’s #Dante2018 Illustrations

Kathia Recio is a graphic artist from Mexico City. During the #Dante2018 social media movement, Recio created a series of illustrations for the Divine Comedy. Pictured above are a few of her illustrations, which you can view on her Instagram. Clockwise from the top left, this the link to the first illustration, the second illustration, the third illustration, and the fourth illustration.

You can check out more of Kathia Recio’s work on her Instagram and on her website.

See other posts related to #Dante2018 here.

Contributed by Pablo Maurette (Florida State University)

Esteban Serrano’s #Dante2018 Illustrations

Esteban Serrano is a designer and cartoonist, and also goes by Cien Perros online. During the #Dante2018 collective reading on social media, Serrano created a cartoon for each canto of the Divine Comedy. The artwork above are a few of Serrano’s illustrations. Clockwise from the top right is an illustration for Paradiso 26,  an illustration for Purgatorio 29, an illustration for Inferno 34, and an illustration for Inferno 24.

You can see all of Serrano’s illustrations for the Divine Comedy on Medium.

To check out more of Serrano’s artwork, you can follow him on Instagram and Twitter.

See other posts related to #Dante2018 here.

Contributed by Pablo Maurette (Florida State University)

Interview with Maru Ceballos

“De la mano artística de Maru Ceballos, y para todos aquellos fanáticos de Dante Alighieri y su Divina Comedia, llega una muestra súper interesante al Museo Mitre. Hasta el 10 mayo de este año se podrá visitar la obra ‘Los círculos del Dante: La Divina Comedia ilustrada por Maru Ceballos’. ¿En qué consiste la obra? En la ilustración de los 100 cantos de La Divina Comedia más los mapas correspondientes a cada cántica (Infierno, Purgatorio, Paraíso). A continuación, la palabra de la mismísima autora.

“Maru Ceballos y su idea de ‘Los círculos del Dante’

‘Me contactó Luciana Ferrazzi del Museo Mitre (habían visto la serie en redes sociales a través de la movida #Dante2018 que inició en Twitter Pablo Maurette). Fue así que me propusieron armarla en el marco de varias actividades que se realizarán alrededor de Dante y la Divina Comedia. Mitre fue un fanático de la obra y – creo – el primer traductor latinoamericano de esa obra en español’ [. . .]

“¿Quiénes pueden participar de esta obra?

Maru Ceballos explica que al tratarse de una obra con énfasis en los simbolismos, hay mucha crudeza y violencia visual. ‘Nada que no esté en los textos de la Divina Comedia”, aclara. “Supongo que no apunta a un público que guste de resoluciones visuales texto-imagen literales. No se van a encontrar a Dante de la mano con Virgilio, sino con un cúmulo de situaciones con énfasis en lo simbólico. Creo que apunta a un público curioso con ganas de ver una versión no tradicional de las ilustraciones de la obra de Dante’

[. . .]    –Julieta B. Mollo, .ITBuenosAires, March 14, 2018.

To view more of Maru Ceballos’ artwork, you can follow her on VSCO, Instagram, and Twitter.

See other posts related to #Dante2018 here.

Contributed by Pablo Maurette (Florida State University)

Maru Ceballos’ #Dante2018 Illustrations

Maru Ceballos is a visual artist known for her striking, inky, horror style. During the #Dante2018 social media initiative, Ceballos created a variety pieces based on the Divine Comedy, and her work was used as promotional art by Museo Mitre for their exhibition “Los círculos del Dante.” Pictured above are a few of her pieces from this series. Clockwise from the top right is an illustration for Paradiso, an illustration for Purgatorio, a portrait of Dante, and an illustration for Inferno.

To view more of Maru Ceballos’ artwork, you can follow her on VSCO, Instagram, and Twitter.

Relatedly, you can read an interview with Maru Ceballos here.

See other posts related to #Dante2018 here.

Contributed by Pablo Maurette (Florida State University)

Bárbara Pistoia’s Illustration for Purgatorio 33

Bárbara Pistoia is a visual artist and essayist. Her work has appeared in the anthologies Ensayos x la identidad (2007), and Matar al macho (2019), and in 2017 published Dinosaurios, a book of illustration. As part of the #Dante2018 social media movement, Pistoia created the above art of Dante and Beatrice for Canto 33 of Purgatorio.

To see of more of Pistoia’s work, you can follow her on Twitter and on her blog.  Additionally, Pistoia coordinates Hiiipower Club, an online space dedicated to hip hop culture and black artists.

See other posts related to #Dante2018 here.

Contributed by Pablo Maurette (Florida State University)

Australian Painter Garry Shead Finds Divine Inspiration in Dante

“Gregorian chants play softly and a curl of incense drifts high into the air at Garry Shead’s studio in Bundeena on the coast of the Royal National Park.

“For almost five months, Shead, one of Australia’s best-known figurative painters, has been grappling with a new series based on Dante Alighieri’s poem, The Divine Comedy. Invoking the spirit of the 700-year-old poet has been “terribly difficult”. He grimaces as he recalls stepping up to the blank canvas every morning, regardless of whether he felt like it or not.” […]    –Ali Gripper, The Sydney Morning Herald, September 12, 2014

 

“Where is Haven of Dante today?”

“Some years ago, I entered a contest put on my Platinum Studios which would award it’s winner a contract with their publishing arm. The property was what became the graphic novel, Haven. If you’re not familiar with the property, you can find out more by clicking here.

“I’ve told the story before about how it started out as a prose novel when Markosia Enterprises took notice of it and wanted to produce it as a graphic novel. But between the time I had written the treatment and the time Markosia took interest, I had entered it into the aforementioned contest. Unfortunately, it didn’t win but that’s OK. What I did win in the process was an awesome friendship that has lasted years with who was one of the top dogs of Platinum Studios at the time, Dan Forcey. If you don’t know Dan, he’s a Co-Producer of Cowboys & Aliens. Dan’s been an awesome source of encouragement for me over the years and loves the property.

“So do I.

“I’m not trying to sound like an egomaniac but like most writers I do pour out my heart and soul into a project so that it is relatable and has depth, purpose and in this case, history. The Dante’s history span centuries so this is a story that could go on forever. And there is still lots of story to tell. As with all new properties, it’s a tough sale….especially with a female protagonist. Don’t ask me why, you’d be preaching to the choir about that one.” […]    –Leonardo Ramirez, “Where is Haven of Dante today?,” Leonardoverse, August 2019

Dante’s Divine Comedy: A Journey Without End by Ian Thomson (Review)

“None of us today would have heard of Beatrice di Portinari had Dante, Italy’s greatest poet, not decided to retain the suggestive name (“Beatrice” signifies blessings) of a Florentine girl whom he conveniently first met at the age of nine – forms of three represent the Trinity in The Divine Comedy’s innovative terza rima – as his celestial Guide. Beatrice takes over from Virgil. No pagan, however distinguished, may enter Dante’s paradise. Beatrice is the initially reproachful (“What right had you to climb the mountain?”) but eventually redemptive spirit who draws the purified poet into the heart of the eternal rose within which, in the bliss-filled closing lines of The Divine Comedy, Dante himself becomes annihilated and immortalised.” […]    –Miranda Seymour, The Guardian, August 12, 2018

Robert Rauschenberg, 34 Illustrations for Dante’s Inferno (1958-1960)

Robert-Rauschenberg-Canto-II-The-Descent-Dantes-Inferno

Canto II: The Descent (1958)
Solvent transfer drawing, pencil, gouache, and colored pencil on cut-and-pasted paper on paper.
© Robert Rauschenberg Foundation

Leah Dickerman: In the middle of 1958, Rauschenberg took on a project that would occupy him across the course of the next two and a half years. He wanted to create illustrations for Dante’s Inferno, a work that was written over 600 years before. And to work on these drawings, he set a series of rules for himself. He would only read one canto at a time, and then he’d make a drawing. He wouldn’t read ahead and so he could respond to it with a kind of freshness.

“Robert Rauschenberg: When I started the Dante illustrations, I had been working purely abstractly for so long, it was important for me to see whether I was working abstractly because I couldn’t work any other way, or, or whether I was doing it out of choice. So I really welcomed, insisted, on it—on the challenge of being restricted by a particular subject, which meant that I would have to be involved in symbolism. Well, I spent two and a half years deciding that yes, I could do that.

“Leah Dickerman: He developed an innovative technique for the drawings. It was a solvent transfer technique, choosing photo-based images from popular illustrated magazines, like Sports Illustrated, or Life and Time. He would soak the images with lighter fluid, flip them over, and rub on their back with an empty ballpoint pen. And that would transfer the image to a sheet of drawing paper. Then, he added touches of wash, and gouache, and crayon, and pencil. In this way, he was mixing images that were snipped from the flow of the contemporary media world with traditional fine art media. And he called them ‘Combine’ drawings.” — “Robert Rauschenberg: Among Friends” @moma.org

View the full series of 34 drawings online at MoMA or the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation.

Contributed by Daria Bernard-Balatti (University of Kansas, 2020)

Infernal Topography: Alpaca’s Illustrated and Interactive INFERNO

“The illustrated and interactive Dante’s Inferno, an alternative learning tool for the Divine Comedy first Cantica, made for aiding visual memory. [. . .]

“The work is based on the anthology ‘Testi e scenari’ – Volume 1 (Panebianco, Pisoni, Reggiani, Malpensa), published by Zanichelli in 2009, and it has been developed by Alpaca together with the Molotro design studio. [. . .]

“The project won the Grand Prix and Gold prize for Didactics at IIID Awards 2017, by the International Institute of Information Design.” [. . .]    —Alpaca Società Cooperativa, 2017

The project was also created with the support of Società Dante Alighieri.

Check out the site here to experience the interactive abilities and full scope of Inferno, Illustrated.

You can check out more of Alpaca’s design projects here, and you can check out more from Molotro here.