Comcast Rant

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“Though I haven’t read Dante’s Inferno in its entirety, I have read enough excerpts over the years to realize that back in 1300, I’m pretty positive that Dante was extremely forward-thinking. In describing his descent into hell, he was obviously creating an allegorical representation of what it’s like to call Comcast customer service with a simple billing question on an innocent enough summer Wednesday in 2011. Lasciate ogne speranza, voi ch’intrate, the gates of hell read as Dante enters. ‘Abandon all hope, all ye who enter here.'” […]    –Sheena Moore, Spend Matters, July 22, 2011

“The Limits of Social Networks”

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“While toying around with Google+, Kevin Cheng wonders if it’s worth grouping everyone he knows: [O]nce I’ve created these fancy Circles, will I actually remember who will see a given post? From my experience organizing my Facebook and address book, I’ve found that I don’t remember the complex taxonomies I dream up. In fact, I don’t know that I can list every person that’s in my “Family” group in Flickr even though it’s less than twenty. When compounded with the high overhead of maintenance and likely outdated groups over time, it’s even less likely that I’ll know who I’m actually sharing a post with.”    –Andrew Sullivan, The Daily Beast, July 20, 2011

Contributed by Steve Bartus (Bowdoin, ’08)

How the Internet Works

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Contributed by Victoria Rea-Wilson (Bowdoin, ’14)

Dante’s Internet: “Serious Business”

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“In the year or so since I started blogging, I’ve found myself ingrained into a number of internet communities which will here remain unnamed. But I have stumbled a cross an unwritten set of rules governing these communities, and someone took these general principles and fashioned them into this handy ‘Dante’s Inferno’ type chart.” []    -Paul Tassi, Unreality Magazine, February 18, 2010

Contributed by Victoria Rea-Wilson (Bowdoin, ’14)

“My Dante,” Frank Ambrosio and Edward Maloney, Georgetown University

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“Conceived as a digital incarnation of the medieval illuminated manuscript, My Dante fosters an entirely new type of contemplative reading experience. MyDante encourages readers to experience the poem in a way that is profoundly personal, while at the same time enabling a collaborative experience of a journey shared by a community of readers.
MyDante was originally developed for a philosophy course at Georgetown University, and a public version is currently in development that will be free and open to anyone.”    —My Dante Blog

Visit Georgetown’s My Dante site.

Guy Raffa, “Danteworlds” (2007)

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guy-raffa-danteworlds-2007-2009“It’s not a video game and it’s not CliffsNotes–Danteworlds is ‘an integrated multimedia journey’ through Dante’s Divine Comedy. Situated somewhere in cyberspace between EverQuest and Solitaire, it’s a terrific way to lose a month’s worth of lunchtime in a cubicle. Most literary texts don’t lend themselves to the ‘integrated multimedia’ approach, which often just whisks readers off the page into biographical or literary analysis land and strands them there. But, in the case of The Divine Comedy, and perhaps other epic poetry–the Odyssey comes to mind–the approach is a perfect marriage of medium and message, launching the reader right into the allegorical action, heightening rather than dulling appreciation and comprehension.” [. . .]    –Vicky Raab, The New Yorker, January 9, 2009

Il Terzo Girone: Italian Food and Drink Database

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Il Terzo Girone

“Putting Your Best Cyberface Forward”

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“In general, scholars do not think of impression management as an intentionally deceptive or nefarious practice. It is more like social lubrication without a drink in your hand. Those studying it online have found that when people misrepresent themselves, it is often because they are attempting to express an idealized or future version of themselves–someone who is thinner or has actually finished Dante’s Inferno.” [. . .]    –Stephanie Rosenbloom, The New York Times, January 3, 2008

Kozik’s Inferno (2000)

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“Kozik’s Inferno” is a twelve-episode animated version by Frank Kozik, a rock n’ roll poster artist in San Francisco. It was featured as an internet cartoon in 2000. (Produced by W!ldbrain, Inc.)

Watch video episode here.

Contributed by George Evelyn

Rolando Perez, “The Electric Comedy” (2000)

rolando-perez-the-electric-comedy-2000“Confronting not the papacy but the postmodern world of the Internet and global economics, this collection of satirical poems inspired by Dante’s Inferno explores the comic and tragic realities of contemporary life. At times graphic and abrasive, the language and style in this stirring collection mirrors the violence and social fragmentation that it describes. The imagined thoughts and interests of Dante as he composed the Inferno infuse this edgy, inventive collection that invites readers to participate in the creation of new mythologies that draw from the wisdom of the past.”    —Google Books