Australian Metal Band, Abandon All Hope

abandon-all-hope-band-2005Abandon All Hope is a metal band out of Adelaide, Australia that was formed in 2005. The band had 5 members – Micah Leinonen as vocals, Jarrod Kennett on bass guitar, Chris Whitbread on drums, and Jake Battista and Shaan Kelly on guitars. The Metal Archives list the band’s lyrical themes as “Hate, Anger, Life, [and] Relationships.” The band split up in 2013.

Their discography consisted of 3 albums – Where Life and Death Meet (2007), A Havoc Command (2010), and Prowler (2011).

Septicflesh, “Dante’s Inferno” (2017)

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In June 2017, Septicflesh released a video for the opening track of their new orchestral death metal album Codex Omega (Prosthetic Records, Sept. 2017): “Dante’s Inferno.” Of the song, Guitarist Sotiris V. says, “We are proud to present the first track from the upcoming album, Codex Omega. The song is appropriately entitled ‘Dante’s Inferno,’ acting as a gateway to hell… as it was inscribed on the top of the Hellgate in the famous poem by Dante Alighieri, ‘Through me you pass into the city of woe; Through me you pass into eternal pain; Through me among the people lost for aye.’ This is just the first glimpse – the entrance to our new album. Stay tuned as more will gradually be revealed with the release date of our new album getting closer…” (cited on metalunderground.com).

The track was one of the “Picks of the Week” on the blog Metal Sucks. Guest blogger Garren L. has this to say: “Septicflesh have once again demonstrated why they are the masters of symphonic death metal. I might go as far as to make the audacious claim that their new track ‘Dante’s Inferno’ has given Dante Alighieri’s Divine Comedy an extra layer of sinisterness. By mixing the brutality of death metal with the orchestral elements normally found as part of a film score, Septicflesh are able to portray the horrific, evil, and grotesque nature of what Dante described in his work.” — metalsucks.net

The video is available here.

Contributed by Paul Ickert (George Mason University ’19)

Sonora Commedia (2009)

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Eerie and beautiful wordless pieces.  Mostly experimental electronic, ambient, cinematic, and new classic, but also some drone, techno, alt rock, and metal tracks (the latter few genres especially for Inferno).

The 3 CDs have pieces written for all 100 cantos by 33 different musicians.  Each musician wrote for a given canto number in each canticle– Krell, for example, wrote for Inferno 20, Purgatorio 20, and Paradiso 20. For Inferno 34, however, a group of musicians collaborated.

Full album on Spotify, or available for purchase here.

Musea/Colossus Project: “Dante’s Divine Comedy” Parts I, II, III (2009-2010)

“Musea’s collaboration with Finnish Colossus Society has been fruitful in these last years, and the newest release is the most ambitious so far: a 4 cd set, with a comprehensive booklet, featuring 34 bands to address the 34 cantos of the “Inferno” part of the legendary 14th century epic poem ‘The Divine Comedy’ by Dante Alighieri (Purgatory and Paradise will be the concept of future releases, in order to complete the trilogy).
With such an amount of bands coming from different grounds within the progressive aesthetics, it is only natural that the conducting line is only maintained by the story and by the usage of vintage instruments (moog, mellotron, etc) which are common to all the guest bands. In part, and besides the fact that this approach secures a wide array of styles and different musical perspectives, it is also true that it makes the album not being as cohesive and focused as the Epic Poem that muses it would deserve. But hey! There are 4hours+ of pure “regressive” symphonic rock to fully enjoy!”    –Nuno, Proggnosis

Click album covers below to see track titles and credits:

musea-colossus-project-the-divine-comedy-inferno.jpg musea-colossus-project-the-divine-comedy-purgatorio.jpg musea-colossus-project-the-divine-comedy-paradiso.jpg

The Mass, “City of Dis” (2005)

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City of Dis is the debut album from Oakland, California’s The Mass, who combine thrash, math metal, hardcore, and jazz into an artful amalgam. The lurching, jagged stop/go riffing of Dillinger Escape Plan is the order of the day, but the riffs themselves are typically more thrash based. The band is amazingly tight and performs with a great deal of precision. This is topped with the manic hardcore vocals of Matt Waters, who also plays saxophone. The sax is present in every song, but not throughout the songs. Instead, Waters picks his moments and provides accompaniment in the style a dual guitarist, or contributes wildly frenetic solos, which sound aggressive and spastic enough to put to rest any doubts regarding the testicular fortitude of the band. If Morphine played metal it would sound something like this.” [. . .]    –Matt Mooring, Last Rites, December 2012

Contributed by Jenn

Decadence, “Decadence” (2005)

decadence-decadence-2005 The first track on this Swedish band’s self-titled debut album is called “Wrathful and Sullen,” the lyrics of which allude to the punishment of those immersed in the Styx.

Ancient, “The Cainian Chronicle” (1996)

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This Norwegian metal band’s second album contains a track called “At the Infernal Portal (Canto III)” which consists of the original Italian and an English translation of Inferno III, 1-9.

Canto 6

canto-6-album-cover“Canto 6 began as Life of Hate, a hard-edged rock outfut along the lines of Metallica and Godsmack. After tiring of that style, the band began working with a producer, reorganized its sound and became Canto 6, taking the name from one of the layers of Hell in Dante’s Inferno.”    –Aaron Yoxheimer, The Morning Call, October 6, 2005 (retrieved on January 1, 2007)

See Last.fm to read more about the band.

Sepultura, “Dante XXI” (2006)

sepultura-dante-xxi-2006“‘Ostia,’ ‘Crown And Miter,’ and (to some extents) ‘Nuclear Seven’ and ‘Convicted In Life’ are what make Dante XXI stand out. The fervor of thrash metal with the bitterness and crunch of metallic hardcore can be heard, and that’s the difference between intensity and the meandering shallowness of Sepultura’s angsty groove formula. These four songs show Sepultura in some kind of revival with a coarser guitar tone richly executing vicious riffs. Bass follows the guitars with fatness and desiccated heaviness under a polished production job. The groove aspect with slappy bass lines and that massive layering had started to become phased out.” [. . .]    –OzzyApu, Metal Archives, August 20, 2012

Iced Earth, “Burnt Offerings” (1995)

iced-earth-burnt-offerings-1995“This is Iced Earth’s heaviest album, but it still retains powerful symphonic sounds and heart-twisting acoustic passages. It also has all sorts of song structures, time changes, and cool stuff packed everywhere. Iced Earth had some long songs on the previous albums, but on this one they show their ability to create a full-fledged epic. ‘Dante’s Inferno’ takes us through the Nine Planes of Hell for sixteen minutes, each plane something new and demonic. This album was written during angry times — and it shows.”    —Iced Earth