“Let it Go,” Dante’s Inferno Version (2014)

Let it Go

As part of a short film, “Chauncy Cobra and the Writing on the Wall,” students wrote and performed a parody of “Let it Go” from Disney’s Frozen. In the song, Dante laments his time spent in Hell, begging Beatrice, “Let me go!”

Watch the music video here.

 

Contributed by Mary Margaret Blum (Gettysburg College, ’18)

Zachary Woolfe, “A Circle of Composers, Intimate and Epic”

circle-of-composers-picture-new-york-times

“There is an operatic quality coursing through the work of the Second Empire sculptor Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux (1827-75), the subject of a powerful exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, through May 26, that inspired a concert of French vocal music at the museum on Saturday evening.

“Look at Carpeaux’s best-known masterpiece, the wrenching ‘Ugolino and his Sons’ based on Dante: Here are both epic scope and intimate detail (those clenched feet!), the combination that 19th-century opera specialized in. It’s no surprise, given the adroitness of his balance between exuberance and restraint, that he was asked to design a relief for the exterior of Charles Garnier’s opera house in Paris. The result, a swirling mass of figures called ‘La Danse,’ fairly explodes off the facade.”    –Zachary Woolfe, “A Circle of Composers, Intimate and Epic,” The New York Times, April 29, 2014

Soweto Kinch’s The Legend of Mike Smith

soweto-kinch-picture-legend-of-mike-smith

The Legend of Mike Smith is a dynamic multi-platform project combining Hip Hop, Dance, Jazz and visual art to explore the permutations of the Seven Deadly sins in modern culture. Written by Soweto Kinch, and directed by Jonzi D it follows the travails of Mike Smith, a young artist as he struggles to navigate his way through a normal day whilst being possessed by other worldly desires and vices. [. . .] The work compares a fantastical world of sin in Catholic texts with a licentious often encouraging attitude towards these things in modern society. Rather than the remote Dantean world of the Inferno, vice often becomes virtue when placed in our contemporary market place, the music industry or political system.”    —Soweto Kinch, The Legend of Mike Smith, 2013

Sequentia, Dante and the Troubadours (1993)

sequentia-album-cover“Although in the works of Dante Alighieri (d. 1321) illustrious poets are often mentioned, a special place of honour is reserved for the troubadours, the Occitan poet-singers of love and war from the 12th and 13th centuries. For this literary and absorbing CD, Bagby & Thornton perform songs (cansos) by six of the troubadours Dante most admired and described in his works.”    Sequentia, Dante and the Troubadours, 1993

Futurama, “Hell is Other Robots” (1999)

Futurama

In the ninth episode of Season One of Matt Groening’s Futurama, the robot Bender is condemned to Hell after violating his contract with the Temple of Robotology.  In their search for Bender, his friends track his scent to the Inferno ride at Reckless Ted’s Funland.  Meanwhile, the Robot Devil leads Bender around the circles of Robot Hell in a song.  The Devil explains: “We know all your sins, Bender, and for each one we have prepared an agonizing and ironic punishment.”

Click here for more information about the episode.

Watch the video clip of the Robot Devil’s song here.

Giuseppe de Liguoro, L’Inferno, 1911

inferno-film-1911

“The Italian epic came of age with Giuseppe de Liguoro’s imaginative silent version of the Inferno, loosely adapted from Dante and inspired by the illustrations of Gustave Doré. L’Inferno was first screened in Naples in the Teatro Mercadante 10 March 1911. The film took over three years to make involving more than 150 people and was the first full length Italian feature film ever made. Its success was not confined to Italy it was an international hit taking more than $2 million in the United States alone.

“Tangerine Dream have composed the soundtrack based on their opera of Dante’s Inferno producing a soundtrack truly worthy of their position as one of the top film music composers in the world.”  —L’Inferno film promotional site

Dante’s Inferno: The Ballet (2014)

dantes-inferno-the-ballet“This new ballet traces Dante Alighieri’s journey through the nine levels of Hell in a chilling and beautiful tour-de-force of music, dance, striking masks, costumes, and choreography. With original music, masks, and sets created by Glenna Burmer, and music conducted by Grammy-award winner David Sabee and recorded at Studio X, this ballet is filled with exciting music, demonic dancing and wild choreography by the master Ronald Tice and Jennifer Porter.”    —Dante’s Inferno: The Ballet

Performances held February 21, 22, 23, 2014 at The Theatre at Meydenbauer Center (Bellevue, Washington).

Contributed By Gabrielle E. Orsi

The New Yorker: Music in Hell

new-yorker-music-in-hell

From The New Yorker (unknown issue).