Mark Scarbrough’s Podcast Walking With Dante Podcast (2021)

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“Ever wanted to read Dante’s Divine Comedy? Come along with us! We’re not lost in the scholarly weeds. (Mostly.) We’re strolling through the greatest work (to date) of Western literature. Join me, Mark Scarbrough, as I take on this masterpiece passage by passage. I’ll give you my rough English translation, show you some of the interpretive knots in the lines, let you in on the 700 years of commentary, and connect Dante’s work to our modern world. The pilgrim comes awake in a dark wood, then walks across the known universe. Join us. New episodes every Sunday and Wednesday.” [. . .]    –Mark Scarbrough, Apple Podcast Preview, 2021.

To listen to the Walking With Dante podcast series visit Apple Podcasts here or the Mark Scarbrough website.

Call Me By Your Name (2017)

“In [Luca Guadagnino’s] movie Call Me By Your Name (2017), during the scene where Elio’s parents are sunbathing in Italy, Elio’s father is reading a book with a marking on the spine that says La Divina Commedia di Dante Alighieri.”   –Contributor Alex Lee

Contributed by Robert Alex Lee (Florida State University ’21)

“The Books That Changed David Bowie’s Life” (2020)

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“David Bowie was a voracious reader and made a list, three years before he died, of the 100 books that had changed his life. These had fuelled his creativity, shaped who he was, and they provide a new way of understanding him. For each book, John O’Connell provides a short, insightful essay and pairs it with a Bowie song. Perhaps surprisingly, only eight books are concerned directly with musical subjects, while 12 relate to various aspects of the visual arts. Some are about mental illness; his half-brother Terry had schizophrenia and died by suicide and Bowie battled depression. There are some interesting poetry choices such as Dante’s Inferno and Homer’s Iliad. Of the eclectic novel collection, some are predictable but many are certainly not, and black people’s and outsiders’ experiences characterise the non-fiction.” [. . .]    —Brian Maye, The Irish Times, March 7, 2020.

“Knowledge is Power” – Andrew Adom

“Knowledge is Power,” a literacy narrative by Andrew Adom in the Digital Archive of Literacy Narratives, in which Andrew recounts his experience in first reading literary classics, such as Dante’s Inferno.