“La Divina Brick-Commedia,” Fabio Broggi

“Ho ripercorso il viaggio di Dante attraverso l’utilizzo dei mattoncini più famosi al mondo. Le diverse immagini rappresentano altrettanti passaggi del poeta lungo la discesa nei gironi infernali, fino all’incontro con Lucifero e la sua fuoriuscita nell’emisfero australe.” — Fabio Broggi

See Fabio Broggi’s Instagram account (@ilcarota) for more images from La Divina Brick-Commedia.

Leonardo Achilli’s Illustrations

Leonardo Achilli, a designer and illustrator from Córdoba, Argentina, completed a series of pen drawings of the entire Comedy in 2018. The images below are from Achilli’s Instagram account: wingderecho.

Wingderecho-Leonardo-Achilli-Dante-ParadisoWingderecho-Leonardo-Achilli-Heaven-Sun-Dante-Paradiso

Tweeting with Dante (2018)

On January 1, 2018, Pablo Maurette tweeted an invitation to a “massive, open, simultaneous reading” of the Divine Comedy, one canto each day, for the beginning of the year 2018. #Dante2018 sparked a viral phenomenon, in which readers across Latin America posted quotes, images, photos, reflections, and other comments on their reading as they kept up with the canto-per-day challenge.

See the tweets at #dante2018.

See also this article in La Stampa about the phenomenon, especially in Latin America and with Spanish speakers (in Italian).

And see Jorge Carrión’s reflections on the viral phenomenon in the NYTimes Spanish edition (essay in Spanish).

Casey Chalk, How Dante Can Help You Become A Better Reader And Thinker This Year

“If this new year is anything like 2017, we can expect more of the same: high-octane political quarrels, nasty public feuds, and the bane of many attempted productive work days and aspired leisurely evenings: controversial online articles and their commensurate comboxes.

“These are often ground-zero for some of the lowest, most base forms of human interaction. Many of us complain about social media’s negative effects on communication, yet we often allow ourselves to be dragged into those same pits of spiraling degradation, even if as amused witnesses.

“If we have any inclination to add “improved Internet behavior” to our New Year’s resolution list, three intellectual giants of our past can help guide us into becoming better readers and communicators. The first of our guides is that greatest of Italian poets, the thirteenth- and fourteenth-century Florentine poet, Dante Alighieri.” […]    –Casey Chalk, The Federalist, January 10, 2018

Beatrice: A New Social Network Platform Focused on the Italian Language

beatrice web platform italian language social network screenshot

“La battaglia per la difesa e la diffusione della lingua italiana si sposta ora sui social. A due anni dal successo di ‘Adotta una parola,’  la campagna volta a sensibilizzare le persone verso un utilizzo più corretto e consapevole della nostra lingua, la società Dante Alighieri lancia una nuova iniziativa.

“Dal nome della musa del Sommo Poeta nasce così Beatrice, la nuovissima piattaforma Web, volta a sensibilizzare le persone a condividere le proprie idee, diffondere una più ampia conoscenza del lessico italiano, tenere sotto controllo l’uso di determinati termini, e più in generale diffondere la varietà espressiva della nostra lingua nel modo della comunicazione a livello internazionale.

“Un progetto all’insegna della partecipazione e della creatività che ha come preciso scopo quello di promuovere e rendere sempre più vivo il nostro idioma non solo in Italia, ma in tutto il mondo. ‘L’idea è quella di sfruttare l’enorme rete fisica che la società Dante Alighieri possiede in tutto il mondo trasformandola in rete virtuale,’ spiega Massimo Arcangeli, curatore del progetto.

“Una volta creato il proprio profilo, l’utente avrà la possibilità di invitare i propri amici, avviare discussioni, proporre idee, postare commenti, immagini e video. Potrà, inoltre, organizzare la propria bacheca, inviare messaggi, gestire il proprio sito personale o quello della parola di cui è custode e allo stesso tempo interagire liberamente con altri utenti. Infine, avrà anche la possibilità di mettersi alla prova testando il proprio italiano, attraverso giochi di parole ed esercizi, per individuare e incrementare il livello di conoscenza acquisito.”    –Francesca Berti, “Arriva ‘Beatrice’ e la lingua italiana diventa social,” Blog di Innovazione, April 23, 2014

10th Circle: Sycophants on Social Media

“If Dante would be alive today and visited India, he would have added a tenth circle of Inferno (hell) in his famous poem, Divine Comedy, and assigned it to Sycophancy on the Social Web. He wouldn’t have to resort to allegory, it is all over Facebook, Twitter and comment boxes on blogs, for everyone to see…
“Sycophancy is defined as the overly fawning behaviour of a suck-up. A sycophant is a person who attempts to win favour at the cost of his own pride, principles, and peer respect…
“Dante would have been certainly shocked by the new fad of thoughtless hero worship in India’s IT hubs, universities and urban hang outs where the youth of the country are subjected to and fall victim for modern propaganda. Dante would have been surprised at the idiots, despite having a degree or two can’t apply the least bit of logic or discerning to what they are told by the media, politicians and the rest of the carpet baggers.” — cited from Sreedhar Pillai on Lasting Rose, July 16, 2013

“Questa volta e’ diverso, Virgilio…”

questa-volta-e-diverso-virgilio-facebook-picture

The Facebook profile picture for “Poeti e letterati citati a sproposito da ragazzini pseudo intellettuali.”

Google+ and McSweeney

google-and-mcsweeney
Timothy McSweeney’s Internet Tendency, August 1, 2011

Contributed by Steve Bartus (Bowdoin, ’08)

Dante + T-Shirt

dante-tshirt
“Dante’s 9 Google+ circles.”    –achristoffersen, Redbubble

Contributed by David Israel

“The Limits of Social Networks”

the-limits-of-social-networks
“While toying around with Google+, Kevin Cheng wonders if it’s worth grouping everyone he knows: [O]nce I’ve created these fancy Circles, will I actually remember who will see a given post? From my experience organizing my Facebook and address book, I’ve found that I don’t remember the complex taxonomies I dream up. In fact, I don’t know that I can list every person that’s in my “Family” group in Flickr even though it’s less than twenty. When compounded with the high overhead of maintenance and likely outdated groups over time, it’s even less likely that I’ll know who I’m actually sharing a post with.”    –Andrew Sullivan, The Daily Beast, July 20, 2011

Contributed by Steve Bartus (Bowdoin, ’08)