The Mass, “City of Dis” (2005)

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City of Dis is the debut album from Oakland, California’s The Mass, who combine thrash, math metal, hardcore, and jazz into an artful amalgam. The lurching, jagged stop/go riffing of Dillinger Escape Plan is the order of the day, but the riffs themselves are typically more thrash based. The band is amazingly tight and performs with a great deal of precision. This is topped with the manic hardcore vocals of Matt Waters, who also plays saxophone. The sax is present in every song, but not throughout the songs. Instead, Waters picks his moments and provides accompaniment in the style a dual guitarist, or contributes wildly frenetic solos, which sound aggressive and spastic enough to put to rest any doubts regarding the testicular fortitude of the band. If Morphine played metal it would sound something like this.” [. . .]    –Matt Mooring, Last Rites, December 2012

Contributed by Jenn

Canto 6

canto-6-album-cover“Canto 6 began as Life of Hate, a hard-edged rock outfut along the lines of Metallica and Godsmack. After tiring of that style, the band began working with a producer, reorganized its sound and became Canto 6, taking the name from one of the layers of Hell in Dante’s Inferno.”    –Aaron Yoxheimer, The Morning Call, October 6, 2005 (retrieved on January 1, 2007)

See Last.fm to read more about the band.

Sepultura, “Dante XXI” (2006)

sepultura-dante-xxi-2006“‘Ostia,’ ‘Crown And Miter,’ and (to some extents) ‘Nuclear Seven’ and ‘Convicted In Life’ are what make Dante XXI stand out. The fervor of thrash metal with the bitterness and crunch of metallic hardcore can be heard, and that’s the difference between intensity and the meandering shallowness of Sepultura’s angsty groove formula. These four songs show Sepultura in some kind of revival with a coarser guitar tone richly executing vicious riffs. Bass follows the guitars with fatness and desiccated heaviness under a polished production job. The groove aspect with slappy bass lines and that massive layering had started to become phased out.” [. . .]    –OzzyApu, Metal Archives, August 20, 2012