Cahit Sıtkı Tarancı, “Otuz Beş Yaş” (1946)

“Cahit Sıtkı Tarancı’s poem entitled ’35 years old,’ when translated from Turkish to English, references coming to the middle of your life, 35 years old, like Dante did when he took his journey to hell (referenced in Canto 1). The line reads, ‘35 years old, that is half way through life, we are in the middle of our lives like Dante.'” –Su Ertekin-Taner

The collection Otuz Beş Yaş was published in 1946. Here is the opening of the poem, in the original Turkish:

“Yaş otuz beş! yolun yarısı eder.
Dante gibi ortasındayız ömrün.
Delikanlı çağımızdaki cevher,
Yalvarmak, yakarmak nafile bugün,
Gözünün yaşına bakmadan gider.”

Read the full poem here.

Contributed by Su Ertekin-Taner, The Bolles School ’22

Magnificent Century, Season 1 (2011)

In Season 1, Episode 14 of  Magnificent Century, Concierge Ibrahim is seen to be reading the Divine Comedy in his office.

Contributed by David Francis

“Pluto’s Gate”: Is the Real Gate to Hell in Turkey?

scientists-reportedly-discover-gate-to-hell-turkey

“It sounds like something out of a horror movie. But Italian scientists say that the ‘Gate to Hell’ is the real deal—poisonous vapors and all.  The announcement of the finding of the ruins of Pluto’s Gate (Plutonium in Latin) at an archeology conference in Turkey last month, was recently reported by Discovery News. Francesco D’Andria, professor of classic archaeology at the University of Salento in Lecce, Italy, who has been excavating the ancient Greco-Roman World Heritage Site of Hierapolis for years, led the research team.” [. . .]    –Claudine Zap, Yahoo! News, April 2, 2013

Contributed by David Israel

Immigrant Conditions Likened to Dante’s Inferno

immigrant-conditions-likened-to-dantes-inferno

“‘. . . The problem with Turkey must be made an international issue,’ Spyros Vougias, the deputy minister for public order, said in an e-mailed statement. Last month, Mr. Vougias ordered the closure of the Pagani center — a converted warehouse that had been housing 1,300 migrants — saying it was ‘worse than Dante’s inferno.'” [. . .]    –Niki Kitsantonis, The New York Times, November 18, 2009