“Paradiso e Inferno” Restaurant in London

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Photo contributed by Ben Le Hay (Bowdoin, ’08)

Dante’s Inferno – A Natural History

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dantes-inferno-a-natural-history-illustrations

Dante’s Inferno has been extensively illustrated, with accompanying notes, by Fabrica, a brand new book published by Mondadori, appearing in bookstores from May 25, 2010. More than 300 illustrations, all hand-made using different techniques and all accompanied by in-depth notation: a meticulous work, which gives the reader a fresh and original interpretation of one of the greatest masterpieces of everlasting literature. Fabrica assigned this project to two young English artists, Patrick Waterhouse and Walter Hutton.

Watch the making of the book on Vimeo.

Contributed by Patrick Molloy

Caroline Bergvall, Dante Variations

caroline-bergvall-dante-variations“As of May, 2000 the British Library housed 48 different translations of Dante’s Inferno into English.

“Poet and sound artist Caroline Bergvall gathers the opening lines of each translation in her sound piece VIA (48 Dante Variations).

“Bergvall reads the opening of each translation then names the translator and the date of the publication. The result is powerful. The overarching monotony sprinkled with the subtlety of each translation and the hypnotic drone of Bergvall’s voice leaves the listener transfixed as they await the next rendering of Dante’s lines. The piece conveys the inherent complexity of the art of translation and illuminates the uniqueness of each translator’s work.”    –Michael Lieberman, Book Patrol, December 15, 2009

Read Bergvall’s piece at poetryfoundation.org.

Listen to the performance here.

Contributed by Patrick Molloy

Yinka Shonibare, Photographer

yinka-shonibare-photographer“In his Victorian house in the East End here Yinka Shonibare, the British-Nigerian conceptual artist, perched on an exercise ball at the wooden table in his book-crammed study, sipping peppermint tea and examining a shipment of faux oysters on the half shell.
A stationary hand cycle sat beside him, an electric wheelchair across from him. One of Bob and Roberta Smith’s slogan paintings, ‘Duchamp stinks like a homeless person,’ hung above him, and a tuna on toast prepared by his housekeeper was sandwiched between a vase of yellow tulips and a stack of Dante volumes: Inferno, Purgatorio and Paradiso. . .
On that gray May day in the East End, Mr. Shonibare was trying to decompress after directing a weeklong photo shoot that involved 25 live snakes, 14 nude models, 6 pigs and 2 lamb’s heads. Inspired by Dante, Arthur Miller, Gustav Dore’ and the financial crisis, the shoot was a work in progress, ‘Willy Loman: The Rise and Fall,’ which seeks to depict what happens after the death of the salesman. (Hint: It’s hellish.)” [. . .]    –Deborah Sontag, The New York Times, June 17, 2009

“Dr. Who: The Impossible Planet & The Satan Pit” (2006)

dr-who-the-impossible-planet-the-satan-pit-2006Second series of Doctor Who, Episodes 8 and 9: The Impossible Planet and The Satan Pit

“Dante’s Inferno” by Alan Sherwood (2002)

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Created with EA Designs

Bootleg of Joy Division’s 1979 Concert, “Dante’s Inferno”

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Winter Gardens, Bournemouth, November 2 1979

See more information at JoyDiv.

“Inferno” The Arches Theatre Company, Scotland

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Retrieved on September 15, 2006

See The Arches Theater Company, Glasgow, Scotland