Kefka – Final Fantasy VI

Kefka, entrapped in ice at the waist, is the final boss in Square’s 1994 video game Final Fantasy VI.

Learn more about Final Fantasy VI here.

Vergil – Halo 3: ODST

“Vergil was a subroutine built into the larger Superintendent artificial intelligence construct of New Mombasa. It later merged with Quick to Adjust, a renegade Covenant Huragok who would subsequently be known as ‘Vergil’ among many humans.

[. . .]

The name Vergil itself is likely a reference to the Divine Comedy, specifically to Virgil, the poet that guides fellow poet Dante through the nine circles of hell and purgatory, much in the same way the Rookie is guided through a metaphorical hell-on-earth, a destroyed New Mombasa, and also through the nine ‘circles’ of audio logs, a reference to the nine circles of hell.”    —Halopedia, August 5, 2019

Learn more about Bungie’s 2009 video game Halo 3: ODST here.

Pathways into Darkness (1993)

“Lasciate Ogne Speranza, Voi Ch’Intrate,” a level from Bungie’s 1993 video game Pathways into Darkness.

Learn more about Pathways into Darkness here and see a list of its levels here.

Dante’s Inferno Video Game 10 Years Later

“Released back in 2010 by Visceral Games – the lovely folks who brought us Dead Space – Dante’s Inferno is a creative adaptation of the classic poem. Through its incredible design, gameplay, and narrative, Dante’s Inferno has come to be one of the most exhilarating action games of the 2010s.

For the sake of presenting a more action-driven story, Visceral went ahead and made a few changes to the source material. Whereas Dante is a poet and Beatrice is a symbol of Divine Love in the poem, the former is a soldier and the latter is his lover in the game.

The story begins with Dante during the Third Crusade (1189–1192). In the midst of combat, he is all of a sudden stabbed; he awakens on another plane having to confront the physical embodiment of death. After defeating death, Dante steals his scythe and returns home – only to find his father and love Beatrice dead. This is when Dante discovers the latter’s soul being dragged to Hell by Lucifer. From there, along with his guide Virgil (just like in the poem), Dante transverses through Hell to save his love (laying waste to every demon in his path).

[. . .]

Ten years later and I’m still amazed by this game. From its fantastic action and creative approach to the source material, Dante’s Inferno is a fascinating title. Inferno proved to be a visual treat to me when I first read it; never could I have ever expected how Visceral Games could take such a classic and elevate its imagery. Dante’s Inferno is not only an amazing action game, but it’s also an excellent journey into one of the most nightmarish representations of Hell ever depicted in art.”    –Michael Pementel, Bloody Disgusting, February 4, 2020

Dante’s Inferno Game on RPCS3 Emulator

“Remember Dante’s Inferno? No, not the 14th century Italian poem. The 2010 console-exclusive God of War knockoff where you shoot crucifixes made of light at demons and have a boss fight with Cleopatra, who gives birth to monsters via her nipples. It was an odd one.

Dante’s Inferno is the latest game to be declared fully playable and glitch-free in the open-source PS3 emulator RPCS3. “Issues with Physics made it impossible to finish some stages normally” before now, and there were some problems with cutscene audio stuttering and generally stability, but that’s all solved and it’s looking lovely in 4K. I mean, as lovely as Hell is ever going to look.”    —Jody Macgregor, PC Gamer, March 8, 2020

Watch footage of the new emulator’s gameplay here.

Mountain of Purgatory in Minecraft

In 2019, Juniors Jack Batton and Connor Smith of DeMatha High School (Hyattsville, MD) designed a playable Minecraft version of the Mountain of Purgatory as their final project for DeMatha theology instructor Homer Twigg’s unit on the Purgatorio. The mountain is organized by terrace, each labeled with corresponding cantos. The terraces depict figures of the penitents engaged in their purgations; pictured at left is the wall of fire on the terrace of Lust. The project was presented at the Academic Symposium at Catholic University in Spring 2019, and a video walkthrough of the world is accessible on YouTube (last accessed April 24, 2020).

In early 2020, Jonas Long, Chris Allen, Thomas Mesafint, Gray Griffin, Seth Barnes (DeMatha HS) took the original concept developed by Batton and Smith and greatly expanded on it in terms of size, detail and complexity. They also have made their map publicly accessible for other teachers and students of Dante to explore and contribute to in the future. Screenshots (right; below) are of the server, and instructions to access the server can be found here (last accessed April 24, 2020).

We thank the designers and Homer Twigg for their permission to share the documents.

Judecca – Super Robot Wars

“Additionally, although it is not clear how these techniques actually work, the Judecca is capable of several devastating arcane attacks that warp its opponents to hostile subdimensions (for all intents and purposes analogous to “Hell”) in order to cause damage.

[. . .]

AGX-14 (AGX-18) Judecca

Height: 70.3 meters
Weight: 389.1 tons
Pilot: Levi Tolar
Armament: Large Claw (mounted on arm), Beam Emitters (many)
Special ability: Warp Field
SRW Attack List:
Energy Drain
Chaff Grenade
First Hell: Caina
Second Hell: Anetenora
Third Hell: Ptolmeia
Final Hell: Judecca”    –Neo Roanoke, Gears Online

Learn more about the 1991 video game series Super Robot Wars here.

Inferno – Doom

“Inferno is the third episode in Doom/The Ultimate Doom. All of the levels in this episode are credited to Sandy Petersen, though Tom Hall originally began two of them.

This episode is set in Hell, possibly the inner region of Hell. The episode is apparently named after Inferno, part of Dante Alighieri’s Divine Comedy. “Inferno” also means “hell” in several languages. Most of these levels have a main, center room that can be easily identified, usually circular or square in shape.”    –“Inferno,” Doom Wiki, August 9, 2019

Learn more about Doom, id Software’s 1993 first-person shooter video game, here.

“Dante’s Inferno 2 Isn’t Happening: Here’s Why”

“A follow-up was heavily teased in the game’s cliffhanger ending, but here’s why Dante’s Inferno 2 never left development hell.

[. . .]

In 2011 writer Joshua Rubin was linked to pen Dante’s Inferno 2, but since then, very little has been heard about a sequel. Following the very mixed reception to Dead Space 3 in 2013 and the cancellation of their high-profile Star Wars game, Visceral Games was shut down by EA in 2017.

The downfall of the Dead Space franchise – which didn’t hit EA’s unreasonable sales expectations – is likely the true reason Dante’s Inferno 2 didn’t happen. Nearly a decade since the original game was released and the shuttering of Visceral make the odds of a sequel very bleak.”    –Padraig Cotter, Screen Rant, January 2, 2020

Learn more about EA’s 2010 video game, Dante’s Inferno, on Dante Today here.

Trinity of Realities – Bayonetta

“The Trinity Of Realities is a term to describe the nature of the universe of the Bayonetta series. As its name suggests, the Trinity is composed of 3 realms that house the traits of light, darkness, and chaos respectively. Bayonetta travels through each of these realms numerous times throughout the games.

[. . .]

Paradiso

The highest layer of the Trinity, Paradiso is home to the Laguna, or angels, and is closest to the human interpretation of heaven.

The Human World

The plane of reality in which humans live, also known as a realm of chaos before Aesir brought order to it with his rule.

Inferno

The realm of darkness ruled over by the demonic Queen Sheba, Inferno is closest to the human interpretation of hell.

Purgatorio

Acting as a parallel reality to the Human World and not necessarily a member of the Trinity. Purgatorio is a realm that is most similar to the human interpretation of purgatory, as the name suggests.”    –“Trinity of Realities,” Bayonetta Wiki, December 19, 2019

Learn more about Bayonetta, Platinum Games‘ 2009 hack ‘n’ slash video game, here.