Internship: Environmental Policy: Natural Resources Council of Maine

Environmental Policy Internships

The Natural Resources Council of Maine (NRCM) is seeking applicants to work as interns to assist the organization on a broad range of environmental policy issues currently facing Maine and the nation. NRCM attempts to place interns year-round, and the internships may be less than full-time to accommodate academic schedules. Internships generally are unpaid positions. However, NRCM does have funding for 1-2 paid internships annually (see details below under “Tomorrow’s Environmental Leaders Internship”).

Internship Experience

NRCM provides interns with meaningful work and an excellent training experience. Interns will contribute to and learn from activities such as:

  • Policy Research for legislation dealing with water quality, renewable energy, climate mitigation, land conservation, and waste management;
  • Legislative Action (when the Legislature is in session) including attending legislative hearings, meeting lawmakers, watching policy debates, and mobilizing activists; and
  • Advocacy Strategy including attending internal NRCM policy meetings, coalition strategy sessions, and advocacy events.

Interns work under the supervision of NRCM’s Advocacy Director, who works to ensure that interns receive extensive opportunities to witness internal operations of NRCM and the environmental policy process.

Qualifications

Applicants should have strong writing and communication skills, a strong interest in environmental policy, and ability to work on multiple projects with varying deadlines. Proficiency with Excel and PowerPoint preferred; GIS skills not required, but may be of use.

Application Process

Candidates may apply at any time. Resume and cover letter should be submitted to lhodgkins@nrcm.org.

Tomorrow’s Environmental Leaders Internship

NRCM provides a $1,000 stipend for 1-2 interns annually. Generally, this intern serves from early June to early August. Candidates who are interested in being considered for this internship, called the “Tomorrow’s Environmental Leaders Internship,” should apply as follows:

  • Applications Due:             March 2, 2018
  • NRCM Interviews:           March 12-23, 2018
  • Notification:                       March 30, 2018

Further Details

Candidates not selected for a paid internship may still be considered for an unpaid internship. Candidates interested in being considered for an internship should send a resume and cover letter to leisa@nrcm.org.

Internship: PAID internship with the Natural Resources Council of Maine- Part time Jan-June 2018

PAID internship with the Natural Resources Council of Maine
Part- time January-June 2018

The Natural Resources Council of Maine has a paid part-time internship from January to June. The position is flexible, averages about 5 hours per week, and the majority can be done remotely.

It’s a great opportunity for anyone interested in the environment, environmental advocacy, communications, and/or education.

Interested?

See the whole job posting and apply on eBear!

 

On Campus Event: Marine Ecologist Nichole Price, Thursday 11/16 4-5:15 (Druck 20)


Nichole Price

Senior Research Scientist, and Seafood Security Center for Venture Research (CVR) Director, Benthic Marine Ecologist
Bigelow Laboratory, Colby College
Thursday, Nov. 16 from 4:00-5:15, in Druck 20

Nichole is interested in how global change phenomena, like ocean acidification and warming, can alter bottom-dwelling species interactions, community dynamics, and ecosystem function in shallow coastal regimes. Her work focuses primarily on the eco-physiology of seaweeds and their current and future role in dissolved inorganic carbon cycling. She is interested in how the balance of primary production/respiration and calcification/dissolution create natural diel variation in carbonate chemistry and perpetuate biological feedbacks. She has focused on these topics primarily on tropical coral reefs, but have recently expanded work to include temperate systems. She utilizes state-of-the-art analytical tools including novel autonomous instrument packages and custom experimental aquaria and extrapolate results to regional and global scales using statistical modelling.

Dr. Price has a B.A, Biology and Math from Connecticut College, M.S, Applied Statistics and Probability from the Univ, California Santa Barbara (UCSB), and Ph.D., Ecology, Evolution and marine Biology, UCSB

On Campus Event: Vulnerability of the Great Barrier Reef to climate change and local pressure (Nick Wolff, Nature Conservancy Climate Change Scientist, 11/20

Vulnerability of the Great Barrier Reef to climate change and local pressures
November 20, 2017 | 7:30 PM – 8:30 PM | Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom
Join Nick for dinner before the talk in the Hutchinson Room, Throne (5:30-7:00)

Australia’s Great Barrier Reef (GBR) is under pressure from a suite of stressors including cyclones, crown-of-thorns starfish, nutrients from river runoff and warming events that drive mass coral bleaching. Two key questions are: how vulnerable will the GBR be to future environmental scenarios, and to what extent can local management actions lower vulnerability in the face of climate change?  Nick Wolff will present new research that addresses these questions and discuss the implications for the GBR’s future.

In addition, he will present research examining the inequities that are likely to arise from climate change impacts on coral reef nations. Few countries are projected to experience coral reef impacts commensurate with their emissions. Of course, no coral reef ‘wins’ under climate change and ocean acidification, but some countries will likely experience relatively weak impacts of GHG emissions relative to emissions while most countries are relative losers. Not surprisingly, the greatest inequity will occur on the reefs of the world’s poorer nations.

Nick Wolff is a Climate Change Scientist with The Nature Conservancy where he applies climate change data to support decisions and strategy development across the Conservancy’s programs. His areas of expertise include spatial and climate modelling, data analysis, and the visualization, management and dissemination of data.

Figure 1. Photos from the GBR before, during and after the 2016 mass bleaching event

Trained in biological oceanography, Nick’s Ph.D. is based on integrating large-scale data sets with climate projections and ecological models to look at the relative benefits of different local management efforts for the Great Barrier Reef.

Nick has 30 publications on topics such as climate change vulnerability, climate change inequity, climate change adaptation, coral reef resilience, conservation planning, connectivity, ecosystem services, biodiversity, tropical cyclones and oceanography.

Nick is a dual American and Australian citizen and loves exploring and photographing the diverse landscapes in both countries

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC FREE OF CHARGE

Off Campus Event: “Climate Change in Maine: What do we Do Now?” Thurs. 11/17 @ 7Pm, Southworth Planetarium, Portland

Climate Change in Maine: What Do We Do Now?
Thursday, November 16 at 7:00 pm (doors open at 6:30
Southworth Planetarium, University of Southern Maine (admission by donation)

Although national media focuses on global and national trends for a changing climate, it is clear that increasing variability and accelerating changes the patters of our weather are altering the lives of Maine people today and more is on the way. The reality is that accelerating rates of change in our chemical and physical climate are a reality of the 21st century, and will persist throughout the lifetimes of everyone alive on the planet today and for generations to come. This is not the latest environmental issue that will come and go with suitable policy and management in a few years. The urgency to limit greenhouse gas emissions continues to grow greater each day, and so too does the need to make cost-effective, evidence-based decisions about adaptation options. The talk will focus on Maine, information from a recent assessment of Maine’s climate future, insights on how these changes influence various sectors of Maine’s economy and the lives of Maine citizens, and how we can take steps to shape the best future outcomes for ourselves and the generations to come.

Ivan J. Fernandez is Professor in the School of Forest Resources, Climate Change
Institute, and School of Food and Agriculture at the University of Maine.

 

 

 

Off Campus: Frontier Theater & Cafe : upcoming films in Brunswick 11/17-11/30

Jane
Written and Directed by Brett Morgen
Music by Philip Glass
Genre: Documentary, 1hr 30mins
Frontier Theater, 14 Maine St, Mill 3, Fort Andross, Brunswick

Oscar®-and Emmy®-nominated director Brett Morgen, described as “the leading revolutionary of American documentary film” by The Wall Street Journal, uses a trove of 16mm footage rediscovered in 2014 from the National Geographic archives to shed fresh light on world-changing conservationist Jane Goodall, founder of the Jane Goodall Institute and U.N. Messenger of Peace. An animal lover since childhood, the 26-year-old British woman arrives in Tanzania’s Gombe wilderness in 1960 to live among the chimpanzees and study their behavior. The rare woman in a male-dominated field, Goodall has no scientific training. What she does possess are binoculars, monumental patience and a keen eye for details, which she meticulously records in her notebook.

Neither Wolf Nor Dog
Directed by Steven Lewis Simpson
Cast: Dave Bald Eagle, Christopher Sweeney, Richard Ray Whitman
Genre: Drama, 1hr 50mins
Frontier Theater, 14 Maine St, Mill 3, Fort Andross, Brunswick

Adapted from the acclaimed novel by Kent Nerburn, this funny and deeply moving film follows an author who gets sucked into the heart of contemporary Native American life in the sparse lands of the Dakotas by a 95-year-old Lakota elder. Kent Nerburn (Christopher Sweeney), a good-hearted, white American family man and writer, receives a mysterious call from a distant Indian reservation regarding an oral history book he made with Red Lake Ojibwe reservation students in northern Minnesota. Despite misgivings, Kent travels across America’s northern plains to arrive at the bleak, poverty-stricken reservation deep in the high plains of the Dakotas. The old man, Dan (Dave Bald Eagle), who lives alone in a clapboard shack back in the hills with his only real companions—his dog, a close friend named Grover (Richard Ray Whitman) and his granddaughter, Wenonah (Roseanne Supernault)—interrogates Kent as to his motives for working with Indian people. Once satisfied he is not a turquoise clad “wannabe” spouting Indian philosophy, Dan recounts the story of American history from the Native point of view. As the stories pour from Dan, Kent’s understanding of the world is turned upside down. An inanimate landscape comes alive, and a history he thought he knew is called into question.

Fellowhip Opportunity: RAY Marine Conservation Diversity Fellowships (for ’17 alums & ’18 grads). Applications open January 2018

Ray Marine Conservation Fellows

Program Overview:

Inspired by efforts to increase racial diversity in the marine conservation field, The Roger Arliner Young (RAY) Marine Conservation Diversity Fellowship Program is a response to the call for mainstream environmental organizations to work to increase and provide supported career pathways for people of color within the field. The RAY Fellowship Program is a paid fellowship designed to equip recent college graduates with an undergraduate degree with the tools and support they need to become leaders in the ocean conservation field; one that fully represents the rich and diverse communities within the United States.

RAY Fellows will be placed within one of our member organizations for a year-long paid fellowship position, with the resources and support to develop experiences that will launch them onto a path of career growth in the conservation field. Fellows will work with mentors, grow their networks, and forge lasting relationships with their cohort of fellows. RAY Fellowship positions are full time paid positions with competitive entry-level salaries plus benefits. Fellows will also receive a stipend of $1,000 to go towards professional development opportunities, in addition to coordinated professional development through RAY Member Organizations.

Applications for the 2017-2018 Fellowship cycle will open in January 2018, and Fellowship positions will begin July 16, 2018.

Ideal Candidates:

The RAY Marine Conservation Diversity Fellowship looks for applicants that demonstrate:

  • Passion and capacity to exercise leadership and respond to social and environmental challenges
  • Willingness to actively contribute to the program as well as take advantage of its benefits
  • Commitment to the values of diversity and justice within the environmental and social change fields
  • The ability and desire to remain an active member of the RAY Fellows Network after the conclusion of the year-long Fellowship
  • Eagerness to connect with and learn from others

Review our application process, timeline, and eligibility requirements for more!