On Campus Event: Marine Ecologist Nichole Price, Thursday 11/16 4-5:15 (Druck 20)


Nichole Price

Senior Research Scientist, and Seafood Security Center for Venture Research (CVR) Director, Benthic Marine Ecologist
Bigelow Laboratory, Colby College
Thursday, Nov. 16 from 4:00-5:15, in Druck 20

Nichole is interested in how global change phenomena, like ocean acidification and warming, can alter bottom-dwelling species interactions, community dynamics, and ecosystem function in shallow coastal regimes. Her work focuses primarily on the eco-physiology of seaweeds and their current and future role in dissolved inorganic carbon cycling. She is interested in how the balance of primary production/respiration and calcification/dissolution create natural diel variation in carbonate chemistry and perpetuate biological feedbacks. She has focused on these topics primarily on tropical coral reefs, but have recently expanded work to include temperate systems. She utilizes state-of-the-art analytical tools including novel autonomous instrument packages and custom experimental aquaria and extrapolate results to regional and global scales using statistical modelling.

Dr. Price has a B.A, Biology and Math from Connecticut College, M.S, Applied Statistics and Probability from the Univ, California Santa Barbara (UCSB), and Ph.D., Ecology, Evolution and marine Biology, UCSB

On Campus Event: Vulnerability of the Great Barrier Reef to climate change and local pressure (Nick Wolff, Nature Conservancy Climate Change Scientist, 11/20

Vulnerability of the Great Barrier Reef to climate change and local pressures
November 20, 2017 | 7:30 PM – 8:30 PM | Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom
Join Nick for dinner before the talk in the Hutchinson Room, Throne (5:30-7:00)

Australia’s Great Barrier Reef (GBR) is under pressure from a suite of stressors including cyclones, crown-of-thorns starfish, nutrients from river runoff and warming events that drive mass coral bleaching. Two key questions are: how vulnerable will the GBR be to future environmental scenarios, and to what extent can local management actions lower vulnerability in the face of climate change?  Nick Wolff will present new research that addresses these questions and discuss the implications for the GBR’s future.

In addition, he will present research examining the inequities that are likely to arise from climate change impacts on coral reef nations. Few countries are projected to experience coral reef impacts commensurate with their emissions. Of course, no coral reef ‘wins’ under climate change and ocean acidification, but some countries will likely experience relatively weak impacts of GHG emissions relative to emissions while most countries are relative losers. Not surprisingly, the greatest inequity will occur on the reefs of the world’s poorer nations.

Nick Wolff is a Climate Change Scientist with The Nature Conservancy where he applies climate change data to support decisions and strategy development across the Conservancy’s programs. His areas of expertise include spatial and climate modelling, data analysis, and the visualization, management and dissemination of data.

Figure 1. Photos from the GBR before, during and after the 2016 mass bleaching event

Trained in biological oceanography, Nick’s Ph.D. is based on integrating large-scale data sets with climate projections and ecological models to look at the relative benefits of different local management efforts for the Great Barrier Reef.

Nick has 30 publications on topics such as climate change vulnerability, climate change inequity, climate change adaptation, coral reef resilience, conservation planning, connectivity, ecosystem services, biodiversity, tropical cyclones and oceanography.

Nick is a dual American and Australian citizen and loves exploring and photographing the diverse landscapes in both countries

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC FREE OF CHARGE

On Campus Events: ES Pre-Major Meetings- Thurs 10/26 7:30 PM & Wed. 11/1 Lunch

Come to an ES Pre-majors Meeting!

Please join ES faculty, and majors for one of two Pre-Majors Meetings. Learn about the coordinate major, the minor, meet faculty and students, and find out more about ES study abroad, ES summer fellowships, research, ES Independent study, and honors- over lunch or cookies and gelato.

Thursday October 26 from 7:30-8:30 PM
ES Common Room, Adams Hall

Wednesday, November 1 from 11:30-1:00
Pinette Dining Room, Thorne Hall

 

ON CAMPUS EVENT: PUBLIC ART ATTACK! AN ART ACTIONS TO FIGHT THE BATTLES THAT NEED FIGHTING! Sun. 10/29

Public Art Attack! Art Actions to Fight the Battles that need Frighting
with Jenny Price
Sunday, October 29, 2:00 PM
Digital Media Lab, Room 115

Join Jenny Price from the LA Urban Rangers art collective for the workshop “Public Art Attack: Art Actions to Fight the Battles that Need Fighting,” a crash course on how to design public art actions to engage any social, environmental, or political problem that might be currently keeping you up at night. They’re fun! They’re experiential! They’re efficacious!

Price is a noted public scholar, writer, and artist who focuses on US environmental topics, including urban nature, environmentalism, and popular culture. Author of Thirteen Ways of Seeing Nature in L.A. and Flight Maps: Adventures with Nature in Modern America, she’s also written for GOOD, Sunset, Believer, Audubon, New York Times, and the Los Angeles Times. A co-founder of the Los Angeles Urban Rangers art collective, she has collaborated on various projects, including Public Access 101: Malibu Public Beaches and Downtown L.A. Trail System. With the Rangers, she was a resident artist for the California Biennial at the Orange County Museum of Art and exhibited in International Architecture Biennale Rotterdam, Performing Public Space at La Casa de Tunel in Tijuana, and the traveling We Are Here Maps Archive.Price earned in AB in biology from Princeton University in 1985 and her Ph.D in history from Yale University in 1998. She has taught at UCLA, USC, Antioch University-Los Angeles, Washington University at St. Louis, and Princeton University. A 2005 Guggenheim fellow and two-time NEH fellow, she has also held fellowships at Princeton, Stanford, and the Rachel Carson Center for Environment ant Society at LMU-Munich.

She is currently co-creating Play the L.A. River as a co-founder of the public arts and humanities collective, Project 51, and is finishing her next book, Stop Saving the Planet! Other Tips for 21st-Century Environmentalists.

ON CAMPUS EVENT: Diversity and Environmental Engagement: A conversation with Whitney Tome, Thur. Nov 2 @ 4:30

Diversity and Environmental Engagement:
An informal conversation with Whitney Tome, Executive Director, Green 2.0 

Thursday, Nov 2 4:30-5:30
ES Common Room,
Adams Hall

Whitney Tome, as the executive director of Green 2.0, leads a campaign to increase the racial diversity of the mainstream environmental movement. Whitney was the director of diversity and inclusion at the National Parks Conservation Association, and a program manager and mediator at the Meridian Institute. At Environmental Defense Fund, Whitney served as a strategist in dozens of state and federal political campaigns and launched the Fisheries Leadership and Sustainability Forum. Whitney earned a B.A. from Middlebury College and a J.D. from American University’s Washington College of Law.

 

 

On Campus Event: Bowdoin Public Service Initiative (Applications available & Info sessions scheduled)

BOWDOIN PUBLIC SERVICE INITIATIVE

Applications now available on program web pages

 “I was personally inspired with the idea that you could do something in your life that was not going to be measured purely by financial return, but by the ability to contribute to others.” – Thomas R. Pickering, Bowdoin Class of 1953, Former US Ambassador to the United Nations and career diplomat 

  • BPS in Washington – (sophomores) education seminar and immersion trip to Washington D.C. to explore topics in government and public policy. Deadline for application – November 8th at noon.
  • BPS Fellowship – (juniors) five funded internships to work in government and public policy in Washington, D.C. during summer 2018. Deadline for application – November 15th at noon.

Upcoming Info Sessions:

  • Monday, October 16 – 7:30pm, Baxter House Common Room (BPS in Washington and BPS Fellowship)
  • Wednesday, October 18 – 7:30pm, McKeen Center Common Room (BPS Fellowship)
  • Wednesday, November 1 – 12:30pm, McKeen Center Common Room (BPS in Washington)

Questions? After attending an info session, come to Sarah Chingos’ drop-in hours

Mondays 12:00-2:00pm and Thursdays 9:00-11:00am. Banister 201 – McKeen Center, in the belfry

Skype and FaceTime appointments are also available.