Off Campus: Preparing for Sea Level Rise (Fri, Dec 8 1:00-2:30 Gulf of Maine Research Institute)

Preparing for Sea Level Rise
Friday, December 8| 1:00PM – 2:30 PM | Gulf of Maine Research Institute 350 Commercial Street Portland, ME 04101

Our sea level rise program brings local relevancy to global scientific data through local history, maps, and case studies. Join us for a 90 minute interactive experience to explore the impacts of sea level rise and weather events on community resources, and examine potential resiliency measures. Please note: the content of this program will remain the same for each of these events.

The space for this program is limited. If you would like to reserve a spot, please fill out the form below.

Questions? Please contact, Gayle Bowness, Science Education Program Manager at gayle@gmri.org or (207) 228-1647

On Campus: “How Culture Shapes the Climate Change Debate” with author and Professor Andrew Hoffman (Thurs, Nov 30 6:30-7:30, Beam Classroom, VAC)

“How Culture Shapes the Climate Change Debate” with author Andrew Hoffman
Thursday, November 30 | 6:30 PM – 7:30 PM | Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom

Though the scientific community largely agrees that climate change is underway, debates about this issue remain fiercely polarized. In this lecture, Andrew Hoffman will examine what he discusses in his book: What causes people to reject or accept the scientific consensus on climate change? Hoffman makes a powerful case for a more scientifically literate public, a more socially engaged scientific community, and a more thoughtful mode of public discourse.

Hoffman is Professor of Sustainable Enterprise and Director of the Frederick A. and Barbara M. Erb Institute for Global Sustainable Enterprise at the University of Michigan.

Copies of Dr. Hoffman’s book How Culture Shapes the Climate Change Debate will be on sale the evening of the event, and at the Bowdoin College Bookstore.

Internship: PAID internship with the Natural Resources Council of Maine- Part time Jan-June 2018

PAID internship with the Natural Resources Council of Maine
Part- time January-June 2018

The Natural Resources Council of Maine has a paid part-time internship from January to June. The position is flexible, averages about 5 hours per week, and the majority can be done remotely.

It’s a great opportunity for anyone interested in the environment, environmental advocacy, communications, and/or education.

Interested?

See the whole job posting and apply on eBear!

 

On Campus Event: Marine Ecologist Nichole Price, Thursday 11/16 4-5:15 (Druck 20)


Nichole Price

Senior Research Scientist, and Seafood Security Center for Venture Research (CVR) Director, Benthic Marine Ecologist
Bigelow Laboratory, Colby College
Thursday, Nov. 16 from 4:00-5:15, in Druck 20

Nichole is interested in how global change phenomena, like ocean acidification and warming, can alter bottom-dwelling species interactions, community dynamics, and ecosystem function in shallow coastal regimes. Her work focuses primarily on the eco-physiology of seaweeds and their current and future role in dissolved inorganic carbon cycling. She is interested in how the balance of primary production/respiration and calcification/dissolution create natural diel variation in carbonate chemistry and perpetuate biological feedbacks. She has focused on these topics primarily on tropical coral reefs, but have recently expanded work to include temperate systems. She utilizes state-of-the-art analytical tools including novel autonomous instrument packages and custom experimental aquaria and extrapolate results to regional and global scales using statistical modelling.

Dr. Price has a B.A, Biology and Math from Connecticut College, M.S, Applied Statistics and Probability from the Univ, California Santa Barbara (UCSB), and Ph.D., Ecology, Evolution and marine Biology, UCSB

Off Campus: Frontier Theater & Cafe : upcoming films in Brunswick 11/17-11/30

Jane
Written and Directed by Brett Morgen
Music by Philip Glass
Genre: Documentary, 1hr 30mins
Frontier Theater, 14 Maine St, Mill 3, Fort Andross, Brunswick

Oscar®-and Emmy®-nominated director Brett Morgen, described as “the leading revolutionary of American documentary film” by The Wall Street Journal, uses a trove of 16mm footage rediscovered in 2014 from the National Geographic archives to shed fresh light on world-changing conservationist Jane Goodall, founder of the Jane Goodall Institute and U.N. Messenger of Peace. An animal lover since childhood, the 26-year-old British woman arrives in Tanzania’s Gombe wilderness in 1960 to live among the chimpanzees and study their behavior. The rare woman in a male-dominated field, Goodall has no scientific training. What she does possess are binoculars, monumental patience and a keen eye for details, which she meticulously records in her notebook.

Neither Wolf Nor Dog
Directed by Steven Lewis Simpson
Cast: Dave Bald Eagle, Christopher Sweeney, Richard Ray Whitman
Genre: Drama, 1hr 50mins
Frontier Theater, 14 Maine St, Mill 3, Fort Andross, Brunswick

Adapted from the acclaimed novel by Kent Nerburn, this funny and deeply moving film follows an author who gets sucked into the heart of contemporary Native American life in the sparse lands of the Dakotas by a 95-year-old Lakota elder. Kent Nerburn (Christopher Sweeney), a good-hearted, white American family man and writer, receives a mysterious call from a distant Indian reservation regarding an oral history book he made with Red Lake Ojibwe reservation students in northern Minnesota. Despite misgivings, Kent travels across America’s northern plains to arrive at the bleak, poverty-stricken reservation deep in the high plains of the Dakotas. The old man, Dan (Dave Bald Eagle), who lives alone in a clapboard shack back in the hills with his only real companions—his dog, a close friend named Grover (Richard Ray Whitman) and his granddaughter, Wenonah (Roseanne Supernault)—interrogates Kent as to his motives for working with Indian people. Once satisfied he is not a turquoise clad “wannabe” spouting Indian philosophy, Dan recounts the story of American history from the Native point of view. As the stories pour from Dan, Kent’s understanding of the world is turned upside down. An inanimate landscape comes alive, and a history he thought he knew is called into question.

On Campus Events: ES Pre-Major Meetings- Thurs 10/26 7:30 PM & Wed. 11/1 Lunch

Come to an ES Pre-majors Meeting!

Please join ES faculty, and majors for one of two Pre-Majors Meetings. Learn about the coordinate major, the minor, meet faculty and students, and find out more about ES study abroad, ES summer fellowships, research, ES Independent study, and honors- over lunch or cookies and gelato.

Thursday October 26 from 7:30-8:30 PM
ES Common Room, Adams Hall

Wednesday, November 1 from 11:30-1:00
Pinette Dining Room, Thorne Hall

 

ON CAMPUS EVENT: PUBLIC ART ATTACK! AN ART ACTIONS TO FIGHT THE BATTLES THAT NEED FIGHTING! Sun. 10/29

Public Art Attack! Art Actions to Fight the Battles that need Frighting
with Jenny Price
Sunday, October 29, 2:00 PM
Digital Media Lab, Room 115

Join Jenny Price from the LA Urban Rangers art collective for the workshop “Public Art Attack: Art Actions to Fight the Battles that Need Fighting,” a crash course on how to design public art actions to engage any social, environmental, or political problem that might be currently keeping you up at night. They’re fun! They’re experiential! They’re efficacious!

Price is a noted public scholar, writer, and artist who focuses on US environmental topics, including urban nature, environmentalism, and popular culture. Author of Thirteen Ways of Seeing Nature in L.A. and Flight Maps: Adventures with Nature in Modern America, she’s also written for GOOD, Sunset, Believer, Audubon, New York Times, and the Los Angeles Times. A co-founder of the Los Angeles Urban Rangers art collective, she has collaborated on various projects, including Public Access 101: Malibu Public Beaches and Downtown L.A. Trail System. With the Rangers, she was a resident artist for the California Biennial at the Orange County Museum of Art and exhibited in International Architecture Biennale Rotterdam, Performing Public Space at La Casa de Tunel in Tijuana, and the traveling We Are Here Maps Archive.Price earned in AB in biology from Princeton University in 1985 and her Ph.D in history from Yale University in 1998. She has taught at UCLA, USC, Antioch University-Los Angeles, Washington University at St. Louis, and Princeton University. A 2005 Guggenheim fellow and two-time NEH fellow, she has also held fellowships at Princeton, Stanford, and the Rachel Carson Center for Environment ant Society at LMU-Munich.

She is currently co-creating Play the L.A. River as a co-founder of the public arts and humanities collective, Project 51, and is finishing her next book, Stop Saving the Planet! Other Tips for 21st-Century Environmentalists.