On Campus Event: Marine Ecologist Nichole Price, Thursday 11/16 4-5:15 (Druck 20)


Nichole Price

Senior Research Scientist, and Seafood Security Center for Venture Research (CVR) Director, Benthic Marine Ecologist
Bigelow Laboratory, Colby College
Thursday, Nov. 16 from 4:00-5:15, in Druck 20

Nichole is interested in how global change phenomena, like ocean acidification and warming, can alter bottom-dwelling species interactions, community dynamics, and ecosystem function in shallow coastal regimes. Her work focuses primarily on the eco-physiology of seaweeds and their current and future role in dissolved inorganic carbon cycling. She is interested in how the balance of primary production/respiration and calcification/dissolution create natural diel variation in carbonate chemistry and perpetuate biological feedbacks. She has focused on these topics primarily on tropical coral reefs, but have recently expanded work to include temperate systems. She utilizes state-of-the-art analytical tools including novel autonomous instrument packages and custom experimental aquaria and extrapolate results to regional and global scales using statistical modelling.

Dr. Price has a B.A, Biology and Math from Connecticut College, M.S, Applied Statistics and Probability from the Univ, California Santa Barbara (UCSB), and Ph.D., Ecology, Evolution and marine Biology, UCSB

Off Campus Event: “Climate Change in Maine: What do we Do Now?” Thurs. 11/17 @ 7Pm, Southworth Planetarium, Portland

Climate Change in Maine: What Do We Do Now?
Thursday, November 16 at 7:00 pm (doors open at 6:30
Southworth Planetarium, University of Southern Maine (admission by donation)

Although national media focuses on global and national trends for a changing climate, it is clear that increasing variability and accelerating changes the patters of our weather are altering the lives of Maine people today and more is on the way. The reality is that accelerating rates of change in our chemical and physical climate are a reality of the 21st century, and will persist throughout the lifetimes of everyone alive on the planet today and for generations to come. This is not the latest environmental issue that will come and go with suitable policy and management in a few years. The urgency to limit greenhouse gas emissions continues to grow greater each day, and so too does the need to make cost-effective, evidence-based decisions about adaptation options. The talk will focus on Maine, information from a recent assessment of Maine’s climate future, insights on how these changes influence various sectors of Maine’s economy and the lives of Maine citizens, and how we can take steps to shape the best future outcomes for ourselves and the generations to come.

Ivan J. Fernandez is Professor in the School of Forest Resources, Climate Change
Institute, and School of Food and Agriculture at the University of Maine.

 

 

 

Off Campus: Frontier Theater & Cafe : upcoming films in Brunswick 11/17-11/30

Jane
Written and Directed by Brett Morgen
Music by Philip Glass
Genre: Documentary, 1hr 30mins
Frontier Theater, 14 Maine St, Mill 3, Fort Andross, Brunswick

Oscar®-and Emmy®-nominated director Brett Morgen, described as “the leading revolutionary of American documentary film” by The Wall Street Journal, uses a trove of 16mm footage rediscovered in 2014 from the National Geographic archives to shed fresh light on world-changing conservationist Jane Goodall, founder of the Jane Goodall Institute and U.N. Messenger of Peace. An animal lover since childhood, the 26-year-old British woman arrives in Tanzania’s Gombe wilderness in 1960 to live among the chimpanzees and study their behavior. The rare woman in a male-dominated field, Goodall has no scientific training. What she does possess are binoculars, monumental patience and a keen eye for details, which she meticulously records in her notebook.

Neither Wolf Nor Dog
Directed by Steven Lewis Simpson
Cast: Dave Bald Eagle, Christopher Sweeney, Richard Ray Whitman
Genre: Drama, 1hr 50mins
Frontier Theater, 14 Maine St, Mill 3, Fort Andross, Brunswick

Adapted from the acclaimed novel by Kent Nerburn, this funny and deeply moving film follows an author who gets sucked into the heart of contemporary Native American life in the sparse lands of the Dakotas by a 95-year-old Lakota elder. Kent Nerburn (Christopher Sweeney), a good-hearted, white American family man and writer, receives a mysterious call from a distant Indian reservation regarding an oral history book he made with Red Lake Ojibwe reservation students in northern Minnesota. Despite misgivings, Kent travels across America’s northern plains to arrive at the bleak, poverty-stricken reservation deep in the high plains of the Dakotas. The old man, Dan (Dave Bald Eagle), who lives alone in a clapboard shack back in the hills with his only real companions—his dog, a close friend named Grover (Richard Ray Whitman) and his granddaughter, Wenonah (Roseanne Supernault)—interrogates Kent as to his motives for working with Indian people. Once satisfied he is not a turquoise clad “wannabe” spouting Indian philosophy, Dan recounts the story of American history from the Native point of view. As the stories pour from Dan, Kent’s understanding of the world is turned upside down. An inanimate landscape comes alive, and a history he thought he knew is called into question.

Fellowhip Opportunity: RAY Marine Conservation Diversity Fellowships (for ’17 alums & ’18 grads). Applications open January 2018

Ray Marine Conservation Fellows

Program Overview:

Inspired by efforts to increase racial diversity in the marine conservation field, The Roger Arliner Young (RAY) Marine Conservation Diversity Fellowship Program is a response to the call for mainstream environmental organizations to work to increase and provide supported career pathways for people of color within the field. The RAY Fellowship Program is a paid fellowship designed to equip recent college graduates with an undergraduate degree with the tools and support they need to become leaders in the ocean conservation field; one that fully represents the rich and diverse communities within the United States.

RAY Fellows will be placed within one of our member organizations for a year-long paid fellowship position, with the resources and support to develop experiences that will launch them onto a path of career growth in the conservation field. Fellows will work with mentors, grow their networks, and forge lasting relationships with their cohort of fellows. RAY Fellowship positions are full time paid positions with competitive entry-level salaries plus benefits. Fellows will also receive a stipend of $1,000 to go towards professional development opportunities, in addition to coordinated professional development through RAY Member Organizations.

Applications for the 2017-2018 Fellowship cycle will open in January 2018, and Fellowship positions will begin July 16, 2018.

Ideal Candidates:

The RAY Marine Conservation Diversity Fellowship looks for applicants that demonstrate:

  • Passion and capacity to exercise leadership and respond to social and environmental challenges
  • Willingness to actively contribute to the program as well as take advantage of its benefits
  • Commitment to the values of diversity and justice within the environmental and social change fields
  • The ability and desire to remain an active member of the RAY Fellows Network after the conclusion of the year-long Fellowship
  • Eagerness to connect with and learn from others

Review our application process, timeline, and eligibility requirements for more!

Internship Opportunity: Doris Duke Conservation Scholar Program (Paid- 2 yr program for undergrads) Apply by 1/31/18

We would like to let you know about an exciting program here at the University of Michigan–the Doris Duke Conservation Scholars Program (DDCSP UM). DDCSP UM is a two-year research and internship opportunity for bright, curious undergraduate students interested in conservation, nature, and the environment. The program is aimed at bringing more undergraduates currently underrepresented in the environmental field into the conservation arena.

If you know any undergraduate students at your school or other colleges and universities who have a specific interest natural sciences, environmental studies/science, or conservation, we urge you to share with them the attached flyer.

In addition to a $4250 stipend, accepted students will also receive room and board, a discretionary allowance and travel expenses to and from Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Please note that the application deadline is January 31, 2018. The program dates are June 2nd through July 28th 2018. Detailed program information and application are available on our website at http://ddcsp-umich.com.

Please feel free to contact us at (734)936-0900 if you would like to discuss the DDCSP UM program further or e-mail us at seas-ddcsp@umich.edu. Please feel free to forward this message along. We apologize if you receive multiple emails. Thank you for your assistance.

Best,
Dr. Dorceta E. Taylor, Director
Kafi Laramore-Josey, Program Manager
Ima Otudor, Program Manager

Fellowship Opportunity: Sea Grant Maryland Paid Research Experience for Undergraduates. Application process begins Dec. 2017, deadline to apply: Feb 16, 2018

SEA GRANT MARYLAND Research Experience for Undergraduates
Each summer, Maryland Sea Grant’s Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program supports fifteen students to conduct marine research on the Chesapeake Bay. It’s a special opportunity to develop your research skills and interests by working with top scientists to study one of America’s most significant coastal resources.

The REU program, funded by the National Science Foundation, is designed for students majoring in marine science, ecology, environmental science, biology, chemistry, engineering, physics, and mathematics.

During the 12-week program, each student works with a mentor on an individual research project at one of the two marine labs at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Sciences located on the Chesapeake Bay:

Applications for summer 2018 MDSG Research Experiences for for Undergraduates program will be accepted staring in December. Deadline: February 16, 2018
Research areas include:

  • Benthic environment
  • Climate change
  • Contaminants
  • Environmental chemistry
  • Estuarine processes
  • Fisheries
  • Modeling and analysis
  • Molecular biology and genetics
  • Physical oceanography

Each REU fellow will receive:

  • A stipend of $6,000
  • Housing costs
  • Round-trip travel expenses

Eligibility

Applicants must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents and have completed at least two years of study towards (but not yet completed) a bachelor’s degree. Preference is given to students who are rising seniors. Students from underrepresented groups and institutions with limited research opportunities are especially encouraged to apply.

How to Apply

Interested students are required to submit:

  • Application form
  • Personal statement
  • Resume
  • Unofficial or official transcripts
  • A list of courses in progress
  • Two letters of recommendation

Learn more about how to apply to the program.

Learn more about Maryland Sea Grant’s REU program

Graduate Program: Coastal Science and Policy Program at University of California, Santa Cruz (Deadline to apply: 12/15/17)

Coastal Science and Policy Program at the University of California, Santa Cruz,
is a new MS Program looking for the students who will start the next generation of conservation orgs.

This new program will select the best 10 candidates from anywhere in the world with all tuition and living expenses covered. I’d like to see the program filled with the best future conservation leaders from high biodiversity countries who are already working with effective conservation organizations. Please forward this announcement to prospective candidates.

The MS program emphasizes international diversity, entrepreneurship and data-driven action to achieve conservation at scale. The curriculum incorporates experience-based learning, hands-on research, and a deep understanding of the multifaceted problems that face coastal systems. In addition to their rigorous coursework, students will be encouraged to take on an internship during their first summer, as well as conduct their own capstone research projects during their second year of study. Linking academic researchers and graduate students directly with conservation, business, and policy practitioners provides dual immersion in the academic and practitioner cultures and contexts and, ultimately, the ability to work fluidly across the science-practice interface.

Applications for the first cohort open October 1, 2017, and close December 15, 2017.
Please forward this email to promising candidates who you believe will be a good fit for the program. Visit our website or blog post for more information.